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Cerebral blood flow, frontal lobe oxygenation and intra-arterial blood pressure during sprint exercise in normoxia and severe acute hypoxia in humans


Curtelin, David; Morales-Alamo, David; Torres-Peralta, Rafael; Rasmussen, Peter; Martin-Rincon, Marcos; Perez-Valera, Mario; Siebenmann, Christoph; Pérez-Suárez, Ismael; Cherouveim, Evgenia; Sheel, A William; Lundby, Carsten; Calbet, José Al (2017). Cerebral blood flow, frontal lobe oxygenation and intra-arterial blood pressure during sprint exercise in normoxia and severe acute hypoxia in humans. Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism:Epub ahead of print.

Abstract

Cerebral blood flow (CBF) is regulated to secure brain O2 delivery while simultaneously avoiding hyperperfusion; however, both requisites may conflict during sprint exercise. To determine whether brain O2 delivery or CBF is prioritized, young men performed sprint exercise in normoxia and hypoxia (PIO2 = 73 mmHg). During the sprints, cardiac output increased to ∼22 L min(-1), mean arterial pressure to ∼131 mmHg and peak systolic blood pressure ranged between 200 and 304 mmHg. Middle-cerebral artery velocity (MCAv) increased to peak values (∼16%) after 7.5 s and decreased to pre-exercise values towards the end of the sprint. When the sprints in normoxia were preceded by a reduced PETCO2, CBF and frontal lobe oxygenation decreased in parallel ( r = 0.93, P < 0.01). In hypoxia, MCAv was increased by 25%, due to a 26% greater vascular conductance, despite 4-6 mmHg lower PaCO2 in hypoxia than normoxia. This vasodilation fully accounted for the 22 % lower CaO2 in hypoxia, leading to a similar brain O2 delivery during the sprints regardless of PIO2. In conclusion, when a conflict exists between preserving brain O2 delivery or restraining CBF to avoid potential damage by an elevated perfusion pressure, the priority is given to brain O2 delivery.

Abstract

Cerebral blood flow (CBF) is regulated to secure brain O2 delivery while simultaneously avoiding hyperperfusion; however, both requisites may conflict during sprint exercise. To determine whether brain O2 delivery or CBF is prioritized, young men performed sprint exercise in normoxia and hypoxia (PIO2 = 73 mmHg). During the sprints, cardiac output increased to ∼22 L min(-1), mean arterial pressure to ∼131 mmHg and peak systolic blood pressure ranged between 200 and 304 mmHg. Middle-cerebral artery velocity (MCAv) increased to peak values (∼16%) after 7.5 s and decreased to pre-exercise values towards the end of the sprint. When the sprints in normoxia were preceded by a reduced PETCO2, CBF and frontal lobe oxygenation decreased in parallel ( r = 0.93, P < 0.01). In hypoxia, MCAv was increased by 25%, due to a 26% greater vascular conductance, despite 4-6 mmHg lower PaCO2 in hypoxia than normoxia. This vasodilation fully accounted for the 22 % lower CaO2 in hypoxia, leading to a similar brain O2 delivery during the sprints regardless of PIO2. In conclusion, when a conflict exists between preserving brain O2 delivery or restraining CBF to avoid potential damage by an elevated perfusion pressure, the priority is given to brain O2 delivery.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Physiology
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Physiology

04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:German
Date:1 January 2017
Deposited On:16 Mar 2017 09:39
Last Modified:03 Jun 2017 13:21
Publisher:Sage Publications Ltd.
ISSN:0271-678X
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1177/0271678X17691986
PubMed ID:28186430

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