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Biodegradation and tissue integration of various polyethylene glycol matrices: a comparative study in rabbits


Thoma, Daniel S; Weber, Franz E; Bienz, Stefan P; Ge, Yanjun; Hämmerle, Christoph H F; Jung, Ronald E (2017). Biodegradation and tissue integration of various polyethylene glycol matrices: a comparative study in rabbits. Clinical Oral Implants Research, 28(11):e244-e251.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To test whether or not chemical and/or physical modifications of polyethylene glycol (PEG) hydrogels influence degradation time, matrix/membrane stability, and integration into surrounding hard and soft tissues.
MATERIAL AND METHODS: In 28 rabbits, six treatment modalities were randomly applied to six sites on the rabbit skull: a dense network PEG hydrogel (PEG HD), a medium-dense network PEG hydrogel (PEG MD), a medium-dense network PEG hydrogel modified with an RGD sequence (PEG MD/RGD), a medium-dense network PEG hydrogel modified with RGD with reduced carboxymethyl cellulose (PEG MD/RGD_LV), a loose network PEG hydrogel modified with RGD (PEG LD/RGD), and a collagen membrane (BG). Descriptive histology and histomorphometry were performed at 1, 2, 4, and 6 weeks.
RESULTS: PEG HD revealed the highest percentage of residual matrix at all time points starting with 47.2% (95% CI: 32.8-63.8%) at 1 week and ending with 23.4% (95% CI: 10.3-49.8%) at 6 weeks. The hydrogel with the loosest network (PEG LD/RGD) was stable the first 2 weeks and then degraded continuously with a final area of 8.3% (95% CI: 3.2-21.2%). PEG HD was the most stable and densely stained membrane, whereas PEG MD and PEG LD matrices integrated faster, but started to degrade to a higher degree between 2 and 4 weeks. PEG MD degradation was dependent on the addition of RGD and the amount of CMC.
CONCLUSIONS: Chemical and/or physical modifications of PEG hydrogels influenced matrix stability. PEG MD/RGD demonstrated an optimal balance between degradation time and integration into the surrounding soft and hard tissues.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To test whether or not chemical and/or physical modifications of polyethylene glycol (PEG) hydrogels influence degradation time, matrix/membrane stability, and integration into surrounding hard and soft tissues.
MATERIAL AND METHODS: In 28 rabbits, six treatment modalities were randomly applied to six sites on the rabbit skull: a dense network PEG hydrogel (PEG HD), a medium-dense network PEG hydrogel (PEG MD), a medium-dense network PEG hydrogel modified with an RGD sequence (PEG MD/RGD), a medium-dense network PEG hydrogel modified with RGD with reduced carboxymethyl cellulose (PEG MD/RGD_LV), a loose network PEG hydrogel modified with RGD (PEG LD/RGD), and a collagen membrane (BG). Descriptive histology and histomorphometry were performed at 1, 2, 4, and 6 weeks.
RESULTS: PEG HD revealed the highest percentage of residual matrix at all time points starting with 47.2% (95% CI: 32.8-63.8%) at 1 week and ending with 23.4% (95% CI: 10.3-49.8%) at 6 weeks. The hydrogel with the loosest network (PEG LD/RGD) was stable the first 2 weeks and then degraded continuously with a final area of 8.3% (95% CI: 3.2-21.2%). PEG HD was the most stable and densely stained membrane, whereas PEG MD and PEG LD matrices integrated faster, but started to degrade to a higher degree between 2 and 4 weeks. PEG MD degradation was dependent on the addition of RGD and the amount of CMC.
CONCLUSIONS: Chemical and/or physical modifications of PEG hydrogels influenced matrix stability. PEG MD/RGD demonstrated an optimal balance between degradation time and integration into the surrounding soft and hard tissues.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Dental Medicine > Clinic for Fixed and Removable Prosthodontics
04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Dental Medicine > Clinic for Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:22 January 2017
Deposited On:21 Mar 2017 15:05
Last Modified:21 Nov 2017 19:28
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:0905-7161
Additional Information:This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Clinical Oral Implants Research, 2017 which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1111/clr.13004. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving (http://olabout.wiley.com/WileyCDA/Section/id-820227.html#terms).
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/clr.13004
PubMed ID:28111809

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