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Extensor pollicis longus ruptures following distal radius osteotomy through a volar approach


Rivlin, Michael; Fernández, Diego L; Nagy, Ladislav; Graña, Gabriel López; Jupiter, Jesse (2016). Extensor pollicis longus ruptures following distal radius osteotomy through a volar approach. Journal of Hand Surgery, 41(3):395-398.

Abstract

PURPOSE: To investigate the cause and pathological process of extensor pollicis longus (EPL) ruptures after correction of distal radius malunion through a volar approach.
METHODS: We included patients with EPL ruptures who underwent distal radius osteotomies performed through a volar approach. Data were pooled from members of the International Wrist Investigators Workshop. Patient demographics, initial injury parameters, imaging studies, preoperative and postoperative examination, intraoperative findings, surgical technique, and outcomes were compared and analyzed. Preoperative and postoperative radiographic images were evaluated and compared.
RESULTS: We evaluated 6 cases from 5 surgeons in 4 institutions. Length of follow-up ranged from 1 to 5 years. On initial radiographic evaluation all malunions were healed with dorsal angulation (20° to 60°) and with positive ulnar variance. Deformity correction in the sagittal plane was 25° to 55°. Osteotomies were fixed with volar locking plates with autologous bone graft except for one patient who received calcium phosphate-based bone void filler. Postoperative x-rays suggested prominent osteotomy resection edges, osteophytes, or dorsal bony prominence resulting from healed callus. Average time from osteotomy to EPL rupture was 10 weeks (range, 2-17 weeks). Two patients initially refused to undergo tendon transfers. One was pleased with the outcome despite the ruptured EPL. The other patient ruptured 2 more tendons and chose to have tendon transfers. One patient also ruptured the transferred tendon after 2 months and underwent successful tendon grafting.
CONCLUSIONS: In the absence of screw prominence and technical flaws, it is likely that dorsal callus, prominent osteotomy resection edges, and osteophytes may contribute to attritional rupture of the EPL tendon after a corrective osteotomy through a volar approach. Exposure and debridement of excessive callus, dorsal ridge, or a prominent Lister tubercle performed during the osteotomy may reduce subsequent EPL rupture.
TYPE OF STUDY/LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Therapeutic IV.

Abstract

PURPOSE: To investigate the cause and pathological process of extensor pollicis longus (EPL) ruptures after correction of distal radius malunion through a volar approach.
METHODS: We included patients with EPL ruptures who underwent distal radius osteotomies performed through a volar approach. Data were pooled from members of the International Wrist Investigators Workshop. Patient demographics, initial injury parameters, imaging studies, preoperative and postoperative examination, intraoperative findings, surgical technique, and outcomes were compared and analyzed. Preoperative and postoperative radiographic images were evaluated and compared.
RESULTS: We evaluated 6 cases from 5 surgeons in 4 institutions. Length of follow-up ranged from 1 to 5 years. On initial radiographic evaluation all malunions were healed with dorsal angulation (20° to 60°) and with positive ulnar variance. Deformity correction in the sagittal plane was 25° to 55°. Osteotomies were fixed with volar locking plates with autologous bone graft except for one patient who received calcium phosphate-based bone void filler. Postoperative x-rays suggested prominent osteotomy resection edges, osteophytes, or dorsal bony prominence resulting from healed callus. Average time from osteotomy to EPL rupture was 10 weeks (range, 2-17 weeks). Two patients initially refused to undergo tendon transfers. One was pleased with the outcome despite the ruptured EPL. The other patient ruptured 2 more tendons and chose to have tendon transfers. One patient also ruptured the transferred tendon after 2 months and underwent successful tendon grafting.
CONCLUSIONS: In the absence of screw prominence and technical flaws, it is likely that dorsal callus, prominent osteotomy resection edges, and osteophytes may contribute to attritional rupture of the EPL tendon after a corrective osteotomy through a volar approach. Exposure and debridement of excessive callus, dorsal ridge, or a prominent Lister tubercle performed during the osteotomy may reduce subsequent EPL rupture.
TYPE OF STUDY/LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Therapeutic IV.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:March 2016
Deposited On:30 Mar 2017 12:39
Last Modified:02 Apr 2017 05:52
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0363-5023
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jhsa.2015.10.029
PubMed ID:26794125

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