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Second-Trimester Amniotic Fluid Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone and Urocortin in Relation to Maternal Stress and Fetal Growth in Human Pregnancy - Zurich Open Repository and Archive


La Marca-Ghaemmaghami, Pearl; Dainese, Sara M; Stalla, Günter; Haller, Marina; Zimmermann, Roland; Ehlert, Ulrike (2017). Second-Trimester Amniotic Fluid Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone and Urocortin in Relation to Maternal Stress and Fetal Growth in Human Pregnancy. Stress, 20(3):231-240.

Abstract

This study explored the association between the acute psychobiological stress response, chronic social overload and amniotic fluid corticotropin corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and urocortin (UCN) in 34 healthy, second-trimester pregnant women undergoing amniocentesis. The study further examined the predictive value of second-trimester amniotic fluid CRH and UCN for fetal growth and neonatal birth outcome. The amniocentesis served as a naturalistic stressor, during which maternal state anxiety and salivary cortisol was measured repeatedly and an aliquot of amniotic fluid was collected. The pregnant women additionally completed a questionnaire on chronic social overload. Fetal growth parameters were obtained at amniocentesis using fetal ultrasound biometry and at birth from medical records. The statistical analyses revealed that the acute maternal psychobiological stress response was unassociated with the amniotic fluid peptides, but that maternal chronic overload and amniotic CRH were positively correlated. Moreover, amniotic CRH was negatively associated with fetal size at amniocentesis and positively with growth in size from amniocentesis to birth. Hardly any studies have previously explored whether acute maternal psychological stress influences fetoplacental CRH or UCN levels significantly. Our findings suggest that 1) chronic, but not acute maternal stress may affect fetoplacental CRH secretion and that 2) CRH is complexly involved in fetal growth processes as previously shown in animals.

Abstract

This study explored the association between the acute psychobiological stress response, chronic social overload and amniotic fluid corticotropin corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and urocortin (UCN) in 34 healthy, second-trimester pregnant women undergoing amniocentesis. The study further examined the predictive value of second-trimester amniotic fluid CRH and UCN for fetal growth and neonatal birth outcome. The amniocentesis served as a naturalistic stressor, during which maternal state anxiety and salivary cortisol was measured repeatedly and an aliquot of amniotic fluid was collected. The pregnant women additionally completed a questionnaire on chronic social overload. Fetal growth parameters were obtained at amniocentesis using fetal ultrasound biometry and at birth from medical records. The statistical analyses revealed that the acute maternal psychobiological stress response was unassociated with the amniotic fluid peptides, but that maternal chronic overload and amniotic CRH were positively correlated. Moreover, amniotic CRH was negatively associated with fetal size at amniocentesis and positively with growth in size from amniocentesis to birth. Hardly any studies have previously explored whether acute maternal psychological stress influences fetoplacental CRH or UCN levels significantly. Our findings suggest that 1) chronic, but not acute maternal stress may affect fetoplacental CRH secretion and that 2) CRH is complexly involved in fetal growth processes as previously shown in animals.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Obstetrics
06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Uncontrolled Keywords:DoktoratPsych Erstautor
Language:English
Date:27 March 2017
Deposited On:04 Apr 2017 13:35
Last Modified:23 Jun 2017 01:02
Publisher:Taylor & Francis
ISSN:1025-3890
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1080/10253890.2017.1312336
PubMed ID:28347187

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Content: Accepted Version
Filetype: PDF (This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in "Stress" on 27.03.2017, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/10253890.2017.1312336)
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