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Primate Resting Postures: Constraints by Foregut Fermentation?


Matsuda, Ikki; Chapman, Colin A; Shi Physilia, Chua Ying; Mun Sha, John Chih; Clauss, Marcus (2017). Primate Resting Postures: Constraints by Foregut Fermentation? Physiological and Biochemical Zoology, 90(3):383-391.

Abstract

Although resting is one of the dominant behaviors of foregut fermenting primates (i.e., colobines), their resting posture has rarely received attention. We hypothesize that colobines are more constrained in their resting position than hindgut fermenting primates and that colobines assume a sitting resting position for specific reasons. To test this hypothesis, we followed two approaches. First, we observed resting positions in two captive individuals each of eight species and tested whether colobines rested in a sitting position more than other primates. Second, we collected literature data on free-ranging specimens of 31 species and again tested whether colobines rested in a sitting position more than other primates. Both approaches indicated that colobines spent more time in a sitting posture than other primates (73.0% vs. 23.2% in captivity and 83.0% vs. 60.9% in the wild, respectively). We hypothesize that the position of the digestive chamber and the necessity of frequently having to eructate digestion gases force colobines to take a sitting posture to avoid pressure on the thorax and respiratory organs.

Abstract

Although resting is one of the dominant behaviors of foregut fermenting primates (i.e., colobines), their resting posture has rarely received attention. We hypothesize that colobines are more constrained in their resting position than hindgut fermenting primates and that colobines assume a sitting resting position for specific reasons. To test this hypothesis, we followed two approaches. First, we observed resting positions in two captive individuals each of eight species and tested whether colobines rested in a sitting position more than other primates. Second, we collected literature data on free-ranging specimens of 31 species and again tested whether colobines rested in a sitting position more than other primates. Both approaches indicated that colobines spent more time in a sitting posture than other primates (73.0% vs. 23.2% in captivity and 83.0% vs. 60.9% in the wild, respectively). We hypothesize that the position of the digestive chamber and the necessity of frequently having to eructate digestion gases force colobines to take a sitting posture to avoid pressure on the thorax and respiratory organs.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Small Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Language:English
Date:2017
Deposited On:13 Apr 2017 06:59
Last Modified:21 May 2017 05:20
Publisher:University of Chicago Press
ISSN:1522-2152
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1086/691360

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