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COMPULS: design of a multicenter phenotypic, cognitive, genetic, and magnetic resonance imaging study in children with compulsive syndromes


Naaijen, Jilly; de Ruiter, Saskia; Zwiers, Marcel P; Glennon, Jeffrey C; Durston, Sarah; Lythgoe, David J; Williams, Steven C R; Banaschewski, Tobias; Brandeis, Daniel; Franke, Barbara; Buitelaar, Jan K (2016). COMPULS: design of a multicenter phenotypic, cognitive, genetic, and magnetic resonance imaging study in children with compulsive syndromes. BMC Psychiatry, 16(1):361.

Abstract

Background: Compulsivity, the closely linked trait impulsivity and addictive behaviour are associated with several neurodevelopmental disorders, including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). All three disorders show impaired fronto-striatal functioning, which may be related to altered glutamatergic signalling. Genetic factors are also thought to play an important role in the aetiology of compulsivity-related disorders.
Methods: The COMPULS study is a multi-center study designed to investigate the relationship between the traits compulsivity, impulsivity, and, to a lesser extent, addictive behaviour within and across the neurodevelopmental disorders ADHD, ASD, and OCD. This will be done at the phenotypic, cognitive, neural, and genetic level. In total, 240 participants will take part in COMPULS across four different sites in Europe. Data collection will include diagnostic interviews, behavioural questionnaires, cognitive measures, structural, functional and spectral neuroimaging, and genome-wide genetic information.
Discussion: The COMPULS study will offer the unique opportunity to investigate several key aspects of compulsivity across a large cohort of ADHD, ASD and OCD patients.

Abstract

Background: Compulsivity, the closely linked trait impulsivity and addictive behaviour are associated with several neurodevelopmental disorders, including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). All three disorders show impaired fronto-striatal functioning, which may be related to altered glutamatergic signalling. Genetic factors are also thought to play an important role in the aetiology of compulsivity-related disorders.
Methods: The COMPULS study is a multi-center study designed to investigate the relationship between the traits compulsivity, impulsivity, and, to a lesser extent, addictive behaviour within and across the neurodevelopmental disorders ADHD, ASD, and OCD. This will be done at the phenotypic, cognitive, neural, and genetic level. In total, 240 participants will take part in COMPULS across four different sites in Europe. Data collection will include diagnostic interviews, behavioural questionnaires, cognitive measures, structural, functional and spectral neuroimaging, and genome-wide genetic information.
Discussion: The COMPULS study will offer the unique opportunity to investigate several key aspects of compulsivity across a large cohort of ADHD, ASD and OCD patients.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Psychiatric University Hospital Zurich > Center for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
04 Faculty of Medicine > Neuroscience Center Zurich
04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:26 October 2016
Deposited On:20 Apr 2017 12:54
Last Modified:02 Feb 2018 12:28
Publisher:BioMed Central
ISSN:1471-244X
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1186/s12888-016-1072-6
PubMed ID:27782808

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