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Short-patch correction of C/C mismatches in human cells


Muheim-Lenz, R; Buterin, T; Marra, G; Naegeli, H (2004). Short-patch correction of C/C mismatches in human cells. Nucleic Acids Research, 32(22):6696-6705.

Abstract

We examined whether the human nucleotide excision repair complex, which is specialized on the removal of bulky DNA adducts, also displays a correcting activity on base mismatches. The cytosine/cytosine (C/C) lesion was used as a model substrate to monitor the correction of base mismatches in human cells. Fibroblasts with different repair capabilities were transfected with shuttle vectors that contain a site-directed C/C mismatch in the replication origin, accompanied by an additional C/C mismatch in one of the flanking sequences that are not essential for replication. Analysis of the vector progeny obtained from these doubly modified substrates revealed that C/C mismatches were eliminated before DNA synthesis not only in the repair-proficient background, but also when the target cells carried a genetic defect in long-patch mismatch repair, in nucleotide excision repair, or when both pathways were deleted. Furthermore, cells deficient for long-patch mismatch repair as well as a cell line that combines mismatch and nucleotide excision repair defects were able to correct multiple C/C mispairs, placed at distances of 21-44 nt, in an independent manner, such that the removal of each lesion led to individual repair patches. These results support the existence of a concurrent short-patch mechanism that rectifies C/C mismatches.

Abstract

We examined whether the human nucleotide excision repair complex, which is specialized on the removal of bulky DNA adducts, also displays a correcting activity on base mismatches. The cytosine/cytosine (C/C) lesion was used as a model substrate to monitor the correction of base mismatches in human cells. Fibroblasts with different repair capabilities were transfected with shuttle vectors that contain a site-directed C/C mismatch in the replication origin, accompanied by an additional C/C mismatch in one of the flanking sequences that are not essential for replication. Analysis of the vector progeny obtained from these doubly modified substrates revealed that C/C mismatches were eliminated before DNA synthesis not only in the repair-proficient background, but also when the target cells carried a genetic defect in long-patch mismatch repair, in nucleotide excision repair, or when both pathways were deleted. Furthermore, cells deficient for long-patch mismatch repair as well as a cell line that combines mismatch and nucleotide excision repair defects were able to correct multiple C/C mispairs, placed at distances of 21-44 nt, in an independent manner, such that the removal of each lesion led to individual repair patches. These results support the existence of a concurrent short-patch mechanism that rectifies C/C mismatches.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Veterinary Pharmacology and Toxicology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Molecular Cancer Research
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Molecular Cancer Research
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Date:2004
Deposited On:27 Mar 2009 15:24
Last Modified:03 Aug 2017 15:00
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:0305-1048
Funders:Swiss National Science Foundation
Additional Information:Full final text Oxford Journal
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1093/nar/gkh990
PubMed ID:15613598

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