Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Evolution of natal and breeding dispersal: when is a territory an asset worth protecting?


Harts, Anna M F; Jaatinen, Kim; Kokko, Hanna (2015). Evolution of natal and breeding dispersal: when is a territory an asset worth protecting? Behavioral Ecology, 27(1):287-294.

Abstract

Evolutionary models of dispersal frequently lack explicit reference to the age or sex of the individuals that disperse. This contrasts with reality where dispersal behavior strongly depends on individuals’ state, including age. To study why natal dispersal occurs more commonly than breeding dispersal, we investigate the interplay of 2 categories of explanation: the asset-protection principle (APP) and the “multiplier effect” (ME). The APP states that adults in possession of territories should be more reluctant to disperse. According to the ME, the simple fact of being born tells individuals that the site is of high quality, which may promote philopatry. Our model is set in habitats of spatially varying quality and individuals express different dispersal rates depending on state (life-history stage, sex, and quality of residential habitat). The model considers the accuracy of information about habitat quality, the proportion of good quality habitat, and the magnitude of habitat quality variation. We show that the predictions of the APP hold, but only when the “invisible” asset of likely future prospects in the current habitat is taken into account. Effects of the ME are consistently harder to detect, mainly due to density dependency overriding the benefits of habitat quality. We predict higher natal than breeding dispersal when territorial vacancies are scarce, and more variable breeding than natal dispersal when they are common.

Abstract

Evolutionary models of dispersal frequently lack explicit reference to the age or sex of the individuals that disperse. This contrasts with reality where dispersal behavior strongly depends on individuals’ state, including age. To study why natal dispersal occurs more commonly than breeding dispersal, we investigate the interplay of 2 categories of explanation: the asset-protection principle (APP) and the “multiplier effect” (ME). The APP states that adults in possession of territories should be more reluctant to disperse. According to the ME, the simple fact of being born tells individuals that the site is of high quality, which may promote philopatry. Our model is set in habitats of spatially varying quality and individuals express different dispersal rates depending on state (life-history stage, sex, and quality of residential habitat). The model considers the accuracy of information about habitat quality, the proportion of good quality habitat, and the magnitude of habitat quality variation. We show that the predictions of the APP hold, but only when the “invisible” asset of likely future prospects in the current habitat is taken into account. Effects of the ME are consistently harder to detect, mainly due to density dependency overriding the benefits of habitat quality. We predict higher natal than breeding dispersal when territorial vacancies are scarce, and more variable breeding than natal dispersal when they are common.

Statistics

Citations

Altmetrics

Downloads

0 downloads since deposited on 30 May 2017
0 downloads since 12 months

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Language:English
Date:September 2015
Deposited On:30 May 2017 13:17
Last Modified:30 May 2017 13:18
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:1045-2249
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arv148

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 1MB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations