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Qigong or Yoga versus no intervention in older adults with chronic low back pain: a randomized controlled trial


Teut, Michael; Knilli, Judith; Daus, Dorothea; Roll, Stephanie; Witt, Claudia M (2016). Qigong or Yoga versus no intervention in older adults with chronic low back pain: a randomized controlled trial. Journal of Pain, 17(7):796-805.

Abstract

The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of the reduction of chronic lower back pain in older adults using either yoga classes or qigong classes compared with no intervention. Older adults (65 years of age and older) with chronic low back pain were enrolled in and randomly allocated to: 1) yoga (24 classes, 45 minutes each, during 3 months), 2) qigong (12 classes, 90 minutes each, during 3 months), or 3) a control group who received no additional intervention. The pain intensity item of the Functional Rating Index after 3 months was used as primary outcome parameter. A total of 176 patients were randomized (n = 61 yoga, n = 58 qigong, n = 57 control; mean age 73 ± 5.6 years, 89% female). The mean adjusted pain intensity after 3 months was 1.71 for the yoga group (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.54–1.89), 1.67 for the qigong group (95% CI, 1.45–1.89), and 1.89 for no intervention (95% CI, 1.67–2.11). No statistically significant group differences were observed. Possible explanations for this lack of pain relief might include the ineffectiveness of interventions, inappropriate outcomes, or differences in pain perception and processing in older adults.

Perspective
The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of the reduction of chronic lower back pain in older adults using either yoga classes or qigong classes compared with no intervention. This 3-armed randomized trial with 176 older adults showed that yoga and qigong were not superior to no treatment in reducing pain and increasing quality of life.

Abstract

The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of the reduction of chronic lower back pain in older adults using either yoga classes or qigong classes compared with no intervention. Older adults (65 years of age and older) with chronic low back pain were enrolled in and randomly allocated to: 1) yoga (24 classes, 45 minutes each, during 3 months), 2) qigong (12 classes, 90 minutes each, during 3 months), or 3) a control group who received no additional intervention. The pain intensity item of the Functional Rating Index after 3 months was used as primary outcome parameter. A total of 176 patients were randomized (n = 61 yoga, n = 58 qigong, n = 57 control; mean age 73 ± 5.6 years, 89% female). The mean adjusted pain intensity after 3 months was 1.71 for the yoga group (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.54–1.89), 1.67 for the qigong group (95% CI, 1.45–1.89), and 1.89 for no intervention (95% CI, 1.67–2.11). No statistically significant group differences were observed. Possible explanations for this lack of pain relief might include the ineffectiveness of interventions, inappropriate outcomes, or differences in pain perception and processing in older adults.

Perspective
The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of the reduction of chronic lower back pain in older adults using either yoga classes or qigong classes compared with no intervention. This 3-armed randomized trial with 176 older adults showed that yoga and qigong were not superior to no treatment in reducing pain and increasing quality of life.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Complementary Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2016
Deposited On:23 Jun 2017 08:29
Last Modified:02 Feb 2018 12:29
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1526-5900
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpain.2016.03.003
PubMed ID:27046802

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