Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Mitochondrial complex I deactivation is related to superoxide production in acute hypoxia


Abstract

Mitochondria use oxygen as the final acceptor of the respiratory chain, but its incomplete reduction can also produce reactive oxygen species (ROS), especially superoxide. Acute hypoxia produces a superoxide burst in different cell types, but the triggering mechanism is still unknown. Herein, we show that complex I is involved in this superoxide burst under acute hypoxia in endothelial cells. We have also studied the possible mechanisms by which complex I could be involved in this burst, discarding reverse electron transport in complex I and the implication of PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1). We show that complex I transition from the active to 'deactive' form is enhanced by acute hypoxia in endothelial cells and brain tissue, and we suggest that it can trigger ROS production through its Na(+)/H(+) antiporter activity. These results highlight the role of complex I as a key actor in redox signalling in acute hypoxia.

Abstract

Mitochondria use oxygen as the final acceptor of the respiratory chain, but its incomplete reduction can also produce reactive oxygen species (ROS), especially superoxide. Acute hypoxia produces a superoxide burst in different cell types, but the triggering mechanism is still unknown. Herein, we show that complex I is involved in this superoxide burst under acute hypoxia in endothelial cells. We have also studied the possible mechanisms by which complex I could be involved in this burst, discarding reverse electron transport in complex I and the implication of PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1). We show that complex I transition from the active to 'deactive' form is enhanced by acute hypoxia in endothelial cells and brain tissue, and we suggest that it can trigger ROS production through its Na(+)/H(+) antiporter activity. These results highlight the role of complex I as a key actor in redox signalling in acute hypoxia.

Statistics

Altmetrics

Downloads

7 downloads since deposited on 27 Jun 2017
7 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Veterinary Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Date:August 2017
Deposited On:27 Jun 2017 12:45
Last Modified:04 Aug 2017 09:29
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:2213-2317
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.redox.2017.04.025
PubMed ID:28511347

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Preview
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 1MB
View at publisher
Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations