Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Severe hyperkalemia is rescued by low-potassium diet in renal βENaC-deficient mice


Boscardin, Emilie; Perrier, Romain; Sergi, Chloé; Maillard, Marc; Loffing, Johannes; Loffing-Cueni, Dominique; Koesters, Robert; Rossier, Bernard Claude; Hummler, Edith (2017). Severe hyperkalemia is rescued by low-potassium diet in renal βENaC-deficient mice. Pflügers Archiv : European Journal of Physiology, 469(10):1387-1399.

Abstract

In adulthood, an induced nephron-specific deficiency of αENaC (Scnn1a) resulted in pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1 (PHA-1) with sodium loss, hyperkalemia, and metabolic acidosis that is rescued through high-sodium/low-potassium (HNa+/LK+) diet. In the present study, we addressed whether renal βENaC expression is required for sodium and potassium balance or can be compensated by remaining (α and γ) ENaC subunits using adult nephron-specific knockout (Scnn1bPax8/LC1) mice. Upon induction, these mice present a severe PHA-1 phenotype with weight loss, hyperkalemia, and dehydration, but unlike the Scnn1aPax8/LC1 mice without persistent salt wasting. This is followed by a marked downregulation of STE20/SPS1-related proline-alanine-rich protein kinase (SPAK) and Na+/Cl- co-transporter (NCC) protein expression and activity. Most of the experimental Scnn1bPax8/LC1 mice survived with a HNa+/LK+ diet that partly normalized NCC phosphorylation, but not total NCC expression. Since salt loss was minor, we applied a standard-sodium/LK+ diet that efficiently rescued these mice resulting in normokalemia and normalization of NCC phosphorylation, but not total NCC expression. A further switch to LNa+/standard-K+ diet induced again a severe PHA-1-like phenotype, but with only transient salt wasting indicating that low-K+ intake is critical to decrease hyperkalemia in a NCC-dependent manner. In conclusion, while the βENaC subunit plays only a minor role in sodium balance, severe hyperkalemia results in downregulation of NCC expression and activity. Our data demonstrate the importance to primarily correct the hyperkalemia with a low-potassium diet that normalizes NCC activity.

Abstract

In adulthood, an induced nephron-specific deficiency of αENaC (Scnn1a) resulted in pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1 (PHA-1) with sodium loss, hyperkalemia, and metabolic acidosis that is rescued through high-sodium/low-potassium (HNa+/LK+) diet. In the present study, we addressed whether renal βENaC expression is required for sodium and potassium balance or can be compensated by remaining (α and γ) ENaC subunits using adult nephron-specific knockout (Scnn1bPax8/LC1) mice. Upon induction, these mice present a severe PHA-1 phenotype with weight loss, hyperkalemia, and dehydration, but unlike the Scnn1aPax8/LC1 mice without persistent salt wasting. This is followed by a marked downregulation of STE20/SPS1-related proline-alanine-rich protein kinase (SPAK) and Na+/Cl- co-transporter (NCC) protein expression and activity. Most of the experimental Scnn1bPax8/LC1 mice survived with a HNa+/LK+ diet that partly normalized NCC phosphorylation, but not total NCC expression. Since salt loss was minor, we applied a standard-sodium/LK+ diet that efficiently rescued these mice resulting in normokalemia and normalization of NCC phosphorylation, but not total NCC expression. A further switch to LNa+/standard-K+ diet induced again a severe PHA-1-like phenotype, but with only transient salt wasting indicating that low-K+ intake is critical to decrease hyperkalemia in a NCC-dependent manner. In conclusion, while the βENaC subunit plays only a minor role in sodium balance, severe hyperkalemia results in downregulation of NCC expression and activity. Our data demonstrate the importance to primarily correct the hyperkalemia with a low-potassium diet that normalizes NCC activity.

Statistics

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Anatomy
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:May 2017
Deposited On:27 Jun 2017 07:00
Last Modified:09 Dec 2017 01:27
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0031-6768
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00424-017-1990-2
PubMed ID:28567665

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher