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Ultrafast transformation of graphite to diamond: An ab initio study of graphite under shock compression


Mundy, Christopher J; Curioni, Alessandro; Goldman, Nir; Will Kuo, I-F; Reed, Evan J; Fried, Laurence E; Ianuzzi, Marcella (2008). Ultrafast transformation of graphite to diamond: An ab initio study of graphite under shock compression. Journal of Chemical Physics, 128(18):184701.

Abstract

We report herein ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of graphite under shock compression in conjunction with the multiscale shock technique. Our simulations reveal that a novel short-lived layered diamond intermediate is formed within a few hundred of femtoseconds upon shock loading at a shock velocity of 12km/s (longitudinal stress>130 GPa), followed by formation of cubic diamond. The layered diamond state differs from the experimentally observed hexagonal diamond intermediate found at lower pressures and previous hydrostatic calculations in that a rapid buckling of the graphitic planes produces a mixture of hexagonal and cubic diamond (layered diamond). Direct calculation of the x-ray absorption spectra in our simulations reveals that the electronic structure of the final state closely resembles that of compressed cubic diamond.

Abstract

We report herein ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of graphite under shock compression in conjunction with the multiscale shock technique. Our simulations reveal that a novel short-lived layered diamond intermediate is formed within a few hundred of femtoseconds upon shock loading at a shock velocity of 12km/s (longitudinal stress>130 GPa), followed by formation of cubic diamond. The layered diamond state differs from the experimentally observed hexagonal diamond intermediate found at lower pressures and previous hydrostatic calculations in that a rapid buckling of the graphitic planes produces a mixture of hexagonal and cubic diamond (layered diamond). Direct calculation of the x-ray absorption spectra in our simulations reveals that the electronic structure of the final state closely resembles that of compressed cubic diamond.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Department of Chemistry
Dewey Decimal Classification:540 Chemistry
Language:English
Date:2008
Deposited On:05 Jul 2017 15:23
Last Modified:05 Jul 2017 15:34
Publisher:American Institute of Physics
ISSN:0021-9606
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2913201

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