Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Are psychosocial resources associated with perceived facial aging in men?


Noser, Emilou; Walther, Andreas; Ehlert, Ulrike (2017). Are psychosocial resources associated with perceived facial aging in men? Gerontology and Geriatric Medicine, 3:1-10.

Abstract

Background: Looking younger than actual age has been related to a variety of health outcomes. Optimism, self- esteem, and relationship satisfaction are important psychosocial resources for mental health. Little is known about their relation with a younger facial appearance.
Objective: This study analyzed whether these psychosocial resources are associated with a younger facial appearance and if their effects were mediated through mental health.
Method: A sample of N = 223 self-reporting healthy men aged 40 to 75 years filled in questionnaires to assess optimism (Life Orientation Test–Revised), self-esteem (Multidimensional Self-Esteem Scale), relationship satisfaction (Relationship Assessment Scale), and mental health (Short-Form Health Survey). Five female raters estimated the visual age of each participant from a frontal face photograph.
Results: Looking younger (compared with chronological age) was correlated with optimism, relationship satisfaction, and mental health. Mediation analyses and structural equation modeling indicated that mental health mediated the association between each psychosocial resource and a younger appearance. Discussion: The results emphasize the importance of promoting psychosocial resources and mental health in men 40+ for the maintenance of good health and the deceleration of facial aging.

Abstract

Background: Looking younger than actual age has been related to a variety of health outcomes. Optimism, self- esteem, and relationship satisfaction are important psychosocial resources for mental health. Little is known about their relation with a younger facial appearance.
Objective: This study analyzed whether these psychosocial resources are associated with a younger facial appearance and if their effects were mediated through mental health.
Method: A sample of N = 223 self-reporting healthy men aged 40 to 75 years filled in questionnaires to assess optimism (Life Orientation Test–Revised), self-esteem (Multidimensional Self-Esteem Scale), relationship satisfaction (Relationship Assessment Scale), and mental health (Short-Form Health Survey). Five female raters estimated the visual age of each participant from a frontal face photograph.
Results: Looking younger (compared with chronological age) was correlated with optimism, relationship satisfaction, and mental health. Mediation analyses and structural equation modeling indicated that mental health mediated the association between each psychosocial resource and a younger appearance. Discussion: The results emphasize the importance of promoting psychosocial resources and mental health in men 40+ for the maintenance of good health and the deceleration of facial aging.

Statistics

Altmetrics

Downloads

3 downloads since deposited on 07 Jul 2017
3 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
08 University Research Priority Programs > Dynamics of Healthy Aging
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Uncontrolled Keywords:DoktoratPsych Erstautor; looking younger, mental health, optimism, self-esteem, relationship satisfaction
Language:English
Date:June 2017
Deposited On:07 Jul 2017 10:55
Last Modified:05 Aug 2017 15:33
Publisher:Sage Publications Ltd.
ISSN:2333-7214
Funders:University Research Priority Program (URPP) Dynamics of Healthy Aging
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1177/2333721417714875
PubMed ID:28660241

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Preview
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 339kB
View at publisher
Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International (CC BY-NC 4.0)

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations