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Regulation of cognition and symptoms of psychosis: focus on GABA(A) receptors and glycine transporter 1


Möhler, H; Rudolph, U; Boison, D; Singer, P; Feldon, J; Yee, B K (2008). Regulation of cognition and symptoms of psychosis: focus on GABA(A) receptors and glycine transporter 1. Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior, 90(1):58-64.

Abstract

Adaptive purposeful behaviour depends on appropriate modifications of synaptic connectivity that incorporate an organism's past experience. At least some forms of such synaptic plasticity are believed to be mediated by NMDA receptors (NMDARs). Complementary interaction with inhibitory neurotransmission mediated by GABA(A) receptors, and upstream control of the excitability of NMDARs by glycine availability can greatly influence the efficacy of NMDAR mediated neuroplasticity, and thereby exert significant effects on cognition. Memory, selective attention or sensorimotor gating functions can be modified in mice with a reduction of alpha(5)GABA(A) receptors in the hippocampus or a selective deletion of glycine transporter 1 (GlyT1) in the forebrain. Both genetic manipulations altered the formation or persistence of associative links leading to distinct phenotypes on trace conditioning, extinction learning, latent inhibition, working memory, and object recognition. Behavioural assays of latent inhibition, prepulse inhibition, working memory, and sensitivity to psychostimulants in particular suggest that alpha(3) and alpha(5) subunit-containing GABA(A) receptors as well as GlyT1 are potential sites for ameliorating psychotic-like behaviour. Taken together, these results qualify distinct GABA-A receptor subtypes and GlyT1 as molecular targets for the development of a new pharmacology in the treatment of cognitive decline and psychotic symptoms.

Abstract

Adaptive purposeful behaviour depends on appropriate modifications of synaptic connectivity that incorporate an organism's past experience. At least some forms of such synaptic plasticity are believed to be mediated by NMDA receptors (NMDARs). Complementary interaction with inhibitory neurotransmission mediated by GABA(A) receptors, and upstream control of the excitability of NMDARs by glycine availability can greatly influence the efficacy of NMDAR mediated neuroplasticity, and thereby exert significant effects on cognition. Memory, selective attention or sensorimotor gating functions can be modified in mice with a reduction of alpha(5)GABA(A) receptors in the hippocampus or a selective deletion of glycine transporter 1 (GlyT1) in the forebrain. Both genetic manipulations altered the formation or persistence of associative links leading to distinct phenotypes on trace conditioning, extinction learning, latent inhibition, working memory, and object recognition. Behavioural assays of latent inhibition, prepulse inhibition, working memory, and sensitivity to psychostimulants in particular suggest that alpha(3) and alpha(5) subunit-containing GABA(A) receptors as well as GlyT1 are potential sites for ameliorating psychotic-like behaviour. Taken together, these results qualify distinct GABA-A receptor subtypes and GlyT1 as molecular targets for the development of a new pharmacology in the treatment of cognitive decline and psychotic symptoms.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2008
Deposited On:17 Feb 2009 07:39
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:01
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0091-3057
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pbb.2008.03.003
PubMed ID:18455219

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