Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Psychometric Properties and Factorial Validity of the Dyadic Coping Inventory – the Persian Version


Fallahchai, Reza; Fallahi, Maryam; Chahartangi, Shiva; Bodenmann, Guy (2017). Psychometric Properties and Factorial Validity of the Dyadic Coping Inventory – the Persian Version. Current Psychology:Epub ahead of print.

Abstract

This study seeks to investigate the factor structure, convergent validity, and reliability of the Persian version of the Dyadic Coping Inventory in an Iranian sample. The sample consisted of 816 participants were involved in a questionnaire study. Factor analysis was used to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Dyadic Coping Inventory. Results showed that internal consistency of this scale by using Cronbach’s Alpha was 0.84, and the internal consistency the subscales ranged from .64 to .81.The findings support the hypothesized five-factor structure (stress communication; emotion-focused dyadic coping; problem-focused dyadic coping; delegated dyadic coping; and negative dyadic coping) for the DCI and self- and other-perception. The psychometric properties of the DCI and its criterion validity with The Relationship Assessment Scale (RAS) were good. This study indicated satisfactory reliability and factor structure for the Persian version of the Dyadic Coping Inventory (DCI). Furthermore, DCI can be utilized for research and therapeutic purposes and it can inspire cross-cultural studies.

Psychometric Properties and Factorial Validity of the Dyadic Coping Inventory –the Persian Version (PDF Download Available). Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/317659074_Psychometric_Properties_and_Factorial_Validity_of_the_Dyadic_Coping_Inventory_-the_Persian_Version [accessed Jul 21, 2017].

Abstract

This study seeks to investigate the factor structure, convergent validity, and reliability of the Persian version of the Dyadic Coping Inventory in an Iranian sample. The sample consisted of 816 participants were involved in a questionnaire study. Factor analysis was used to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Dyadic Coping Inventory. Results showed that internal consistency of this scale by using Cronbach’s Alpha was 0.84, and the internal consistency the subscales ranged from .64 to .81.The findings support the hypothesized five-factor structure (stress communication; emotion-focused dyadic coping; problem-focused dyadic coping; delegated dyadic coping; and negative dyadic coping) for the DCI and self- and other-perception. The psychometric properties of the DCI and its criterion validity with The Relationship Assessment Scale (RAS) were good. This study indicated satisfactory reliability and factor structure for the Persian version of the Dyadic Coping Inventory (DCI). Furthermore, DCI can be utilized for research and therapeutic purposes and it can inspire cross-cultural studies.

Psychometric Properties and Factorial Validity of the Dyadic Coping Inventory –the Persian Version (PDF Download Available). Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/317659074_Psychometric_Properties_and_Factorial_Validity_of_the_Dyadic_Coping_Inventory_-the_Persian_Version [accessed Jul 21, 2017].

Statistics

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Date:2017
Deposited On:21 Jul 2017 11:55
Last Modified:21 Jul 2017 11:55
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:1046-1310
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s12144-017-9624-6

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations