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In vivo and in vitro proteome analysis of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-1-infected, human CD4(+) T cells


Nemeth, Johannes; Vongrad, Valentina; Metzner, Karin J; Strouvelle, Victoria P; Weber, Rainer; Pedrioli, Patrick G A; Aebersold, Ruedi; Günthard, Huldrych F; Collins, Ben C (2017). In vivo and in vitro proteome analysis of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-1-infected, human CD4(+) T cells. Molecular & Cellular Proteomics, 16(4 suppl 1):S108-S123.

Abstract

Host-directed therapies against HIV-1 are thought to be critical for long term containment of the HIV-1 pandemic but remain elusive. Because HIV-1 infects and manipulates important effectors of both the innate and adaptive immune system, identifying modulations of the host cell systems in humans during HIV-1 infection may be crucial for the development of immune based therapies. Here, we quantified the changes of the proteome in human CD4(+) T cells upon HIV-1 infection, both in vitro and in vivo A SWATH-MS approach was used to measure the proteome of human primary CD4(+) T cells infected with HIV-1 in vitro as well as CD4(+) T cells from HIV-1-infected patients with paired samples on and off antiretroviral treatment. In the in vitro experiment, the proteome of CD4(+) T cells was quantified over a time course following HIV-1 infection. 1,725 host cell proteins and 4 HIV-1 proteins were quantified, with 145 proteins changing significantly during the time course. Changes in the proteome peaked 24 h after infection, concomitantly with significant HIV-1 protein production. In the in vivo branch of the study, CD4(+) T cells from viremic patients and those with no detectable viral load after treatment were sorted, and the proteomes were quantified. We consistently detected 895 proteins, 172 of which were considered to be significantly different between the viremic patients and patients undergoing successful treatment. The proteome of the in vitro-infected CD4(+) T cells was modulated on multiple functional levels, including TLR-4 signaling and the type 1 interferon signaling pathway. Perturbations in the type 1 interferon signaling pathway were recapitulated in CD4(+) T cells from patients. The study shows that proteome maps generated by SWATH-MS indicate a range of functionally significant changes in the proteome of HIV-infected human CD4(+) T cells. Exploring these perturbations in more detail may help identify new targets for immune based interventions.

Abstract

Host-directed therapies against HIV-1 are thought to be critical for long term containment of the HIV-1 pandemic but remain elusive. Because HIV-1 infects and manipulates important effectors of both the innate and adaptive immune system, identifying modulations of the host cell systems in humans during HIV-1 infection may be crucial for the development of immune based therapies. Here, we quantified the changes of the proteome in human CD4(+) T cells upon HIV-1 infection, both in vitro and in vivo A SWATH-MS approach was used to measure the proteome of human primary CD4(+) T cells infected with HIV-1 in vitro as well as CD4(+) T cells from HIV-1-infected patients with paired samples on and off antiretroviral treatment. In the in vitro experiment, the proteome of CD4(+) T cells was quantified over a time course following HIV-1 infection. 1,725 host cell proteins and 4 HIV-1 proteins were quantified, with 145 proteins changing significantly during the time course. Changes in the proteome peaked 24 h after infection, concomitantly with significant HIV-1 protein production. In the in vivo branch of the study, CD4(+) T cells from viremic patients and those with no detectable viral load after treatment were sorted, and the proteomes were quantified. We consistently detected 895 proteins, 172 of which were considered to be significantly different between the viremic patients and patients undergoing successful treatment. The proteome of the in vitro-infected CD4(+) T cells was modulated on multiple functional levels, including TLR-4 signaling and the type 1 interferon signaling pathway. Perturbations in the type 1 interferon signaling pathway were recapitulated in CD4(+) T cells from patients. The study shows that proteome maps generated by SWATH-MS indicate a range of functionally significant changes in the proteome of HIV-infected human CD4(+) T cells. Exploring these perturbations in more detail may help identify new targets for immune based interventions.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Infectious Diseases
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:21 February 2017
Deposited On:03 Aug 2017 17:13
Last Modified:04 Aug 2017 07:47
Publisher:American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
ISSN:1535-9476
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1074/mcp.M116.065235
PubMed ID:28223351
Other Identification Number:PMC5393404

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