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Resisting sleep pressure: Impact on resting state functional network connectivity


Tüshaus, Laura; Balsters, Joshua Henk; Schläpfer, Anthony; Brandeis, Daniel; O'Gorman Tuura, Ruth; Achermann, Peter (2017). Resisting sleep pressure: Impact on resting state functional network connectivity. Brain Topography, 30(6):757-773.

Abstract

In today's 24/7 society, sleep restriction is a common phenomenon which leads to increased levels of sleep pressure in daily life. However, the magnitude and extent of impairment of brain functioning due to increased sleep pressure is still not completely understood. Resting state network (RSN) analyses have become increasingly popular because they allow us to investigate brain activity patterns in the absence of a specific task and to identify changes under different levels of vigilance (e.g. due to increased sleep pressure). RSNs are commonly derived from BOLD fMRI signals but studies progressively also employ cerebral blood flow (CBF) signals. To investigate the impact of sleep pressure on RSNs, we examined RSNs of participants under high (19 h awake) and normal (10 h awake) sleep pressure with three imaging modalities (arterial spin labeling, BOLD, pseudo BOLD) while providing confirmation of vigilance states in most conditions. We demonstrated that CBF and pseudo BOLD signals (measured with arterial spin labeling) are suited to derive independent component analysis based RSNs. The spatial map differences of these RSNs were rather small, suggesting a strong biological substrate underlying these networks. Interestingly, increased sleep pressure, namely longer time awake, specifically changed the functional network connectivity (FNC) between RSNs. In summary, all FNCs of the default mode network with any other network or component showed increasing effects as a function of increased 'time awake'. All other FNCs became more anti-correlated with increased 'time awake'. The sensorimotor networks were the only ones who showed a within network change of FNC, namely decreased connectivity as function of 'time awake'. These specific changes of FNC could reflect both compensatory mechanisms aiming to fight sleep as well as a first reduction of consciousness while becoming drowsy. We think that the specific changes observed in functional network connectivity could imply an impairment of information transfer between the affected RSNs.

Abstract

In today's 24/7 society, sleep restriction is a common phenomenon which leads to increased levels of sleep pressure in daily life. However, the magnitude and extent of impairment of brain functioning due to increased sleep pressure is still not completely understood. Resting state network (RSN) analyses have become increasingly popular because they allow us to investigate brain activity patterns in the absence of a specific task and to identify changes under different levels of vigilance (e.g. due to increased sleep pressure). RSNs are commonly derived from BOLD fMRI signals but studies progressively also employ cerebral blood flow (CBF) signals. To investigate the impact of sleep pressure on RSNs, we examined RSNs of participants under high (19 h awake) and normal (10 h awake) sleep pressure with three imaging modalities (arterial spin labeling, BOLD, pseudo BOLD) while providing confirmation of vigilance states in most conditions. We demonstrated that CBF and pseudo BOLD signals (measured with arterial spin labeling) are suited to derive independent component analysis based RSNs. The spatial map differences of these RSNs were rather small, suggesting a strong biological substrate underlying these networks. Interestingly, increased sleep pressure, namely longer time awake, specifically changed the functional network connectivity (FNC) between RSNs. In summary, all FNCs of the default mode network with any other network or component showed increasing effects as a function of increased 'time awake'. All other FNCs became more anti-correlated with increased 'time awake'. The sensorimotor networks were the only ones who showed a within network change of FNC, namely decreased connectivity as function of 'time awake'. These specific changes of FNC could reflect both compensatory mechanisms aiming to fight sleep as well as a first reduction of consciousness while becoming drowsy. We think that the specific changes observed in functional network connectivity could imply an impairment of information transfer between the affected RSNs.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology

04 Faculty of Medicine > Psychiatric University Hospital Zurich > Center for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
04 Faculty of Medicine > Neuroscience Center Zurich
04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Uncontrolled Keywords:Arterial spin labeling; BOLD; Cerebral blood flow; Imaging modality; Independent component analysis; Pseudo BOLD; Time awake; Vigilance
Date:15 July 2017
Deposited On:03 Aug 2017 16:38
Last Modified:19 Feb 2018 08:20
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0896-0267
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s10548-017-0575-x
PubMed ID:28712063

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