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Comparison of in vivo immune responses following transplantation of vascularized and non-vascularized human dermo-epidermal skin substitutes


Klar, Agnes S; Biedermann, Thomas; Simmen-Meuli, Claudia; Reichmann, Ernst; Meuli, Martin (2017). Comparison of in vivo immune responses following transplantation of vascularized and non-vascularized human dermo-epidermal skin substitutes. Pediatric Surgery International, 33(3):377-382.

Abstract

PURPOSE: Autologous bio-engineered dermo-epidermal skin substitutes (DESS) represent an alternative therapeutic option for a definitive treatment of skin defects in human patients. Largely, the interaction of host immune cells with transplanted DESS is considered to be essential for the granulation tissue formation, graft take, and its functionality. The aim of this study was to compare the spatiotemporal distribution and density of host-derived monocytes/macrophages and granulocytes in vascularized (vascDESS) versus non-vascularized DESS (non-vascDESS) in a rat model.
METHODS: Keratinocytes and the stromal vascular fraction (SVF) were derived from human skin or human adipose tissue, respectively. Human SVF containing both endothelial and mesenchymal/stromal progenitors was used to develop a vascularized collagen type I-based dermal component in vitro. The donor-matched, monolayer-expanded adipose stromal cells lacking endothelial cells were used as a negative control. Subsequently, human keratinocytes were seeded on top of hydrogels to build dermo-epidermal skin grafts. After transplantation onto full-thickness skin wounds on the back of immuno-incompetent rats, grafts were excised and analyzed after 1 and 3 weeks. The expression of distinct inflammatory cell markers specific for host-derived monocytes/macrophages (CD11b, CD68) or granulocytes (HIS48) was analyzed by immunofluorescence microscopy.
RESULTS: All skin grafts were infiltrated by host-derived monocytes/macrophages (CD11b(+), CD68(+)) and granulocytes (HIS48(+)) between 1-3 week post-transplantation. When compared to non-vascDESS, the vascDESS showed an increased granulocyte infiltration at all time points analyzed with the majority of cells scattered throughout the whole dermal part. Whereas a moderate number of rat monocytes/macrophages (CD11b(+), CD68(+)) were found in vascDESS at 1 week, only a few cells were detected in non-vascDESS. We observed a time-dependent decrease of monocytes/macrophages in all transplants at 3 weeks.
CONCLUSIONS: These results demonstrate a distinct spatiotemporal distribution of monocytes/macrophages as well as granulocytes in our transplants that closely resemble the one observed during physiological wound healing. The differences identified between vascDESS and non-vascDESS may indicate that human endothelial cells lining blood capillaries of vascDESS accelerate infiltration of monocytes and leukocytes.

Abstract

PURPOSE: Autologous bio-engineered dermo-epidermal skin substitutes (DESS) represent an alternative therapeutic option for a definitive treatment of skin defects in human patients. Largely, the interaction of host immune cells with transplanted DESS is considered to be essential for the granulation tissue formation, graft take, and its functionality. The aim of this study was to compare the spatiotemporal distribution and density of host-derived monocytes/macrophages and granulocytes in vascularized (vascDESS) versus non-vascularized DESS (non-vascDESS) in a rat model.
METHODS: Keratinocytes and the stromal vascular fraction (SVF) were derived from human skin or human adipose tissue, respectively. Human SVF containing both endothelial and mesenchymal/stromal progenitors was used to develop a vascularized collagen type I-based dermal component in vitro. The donor-matched, monolayer-expanded adipose stromal cells lacking endothelial cells were used as a negative control. Subsequently, human keratinocytes were seeded on top of hydrogels to build dermo-epidermal skin grafts. After transplantation onto full-thickness skin wounds on the back of immuno-incompetent rats, grafts were excised and analyzed after 1 and 3 weeks. The expression of distinct inflammatory cell markers specific for host-derived monocytes/macrophages (CD11b, CD68) or granulocytes (HIS48) was analyzed by immunofluorescence microscopy.
RESULTS: All skin grafts were infiltrated by host-derived monocytes/macrophages (CD11b(+), CD68(+)) and granulocytes (HIS48(+)) between 1-3 week post-transplantation. When compared to non-vascDESS, the vascDESS showed an increased granulocyte infiltration at all time points analyzed with the majority of cells scattered throughout the whole dermal part. Whereas a moderate number of rat monocytes/macrophages (CD11b(+), CD68(+)) were found in vascDESS at 1 week, only a few cells were detected in non-vascDESS. We observed a time-dependent decrease of monocytes/macrophages in all transplants at 3 weeks.
CONCLUSIONS: These results demonstrate a distinct spatiotemporal distribution of monocytes/macrophages as well as granulocytes in our transplants that closely resemble the one observed during physiological wound healing. The differences identified between vascDESS and non-vascDESS may indicate that human endothelial cells lining blood capillaries of vascDESS accelerate infiltration of monocytes and leukocytes.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:March 2017
Deposited On:24 Aug 2017 13:21
Last Modified:30 Aug 2017 15:07
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0179-0358
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00383-016-4031-x
PubMed ID:27999947

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