Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Consistent detection of bovine papillomavirus in lesions, intact skin and peripheral blood mononuclear cells of horses affected by hoof canker


Brandt, Simone; Schoster, Angelika; Tober, R; Kainzbauer, C; Burgstaller, J P; Haralambus, R; Steinborn, R; Hinterhofer, C; Stanek, C (2011). Consistent detection of bovine papillomavirus in lesions, intact skin and peripheral blood mononuclear cells of horses affected by hoof canker. Equine Veterinary Journal, 43(2):202-209.

Abstract

REASONS FOR PERFORMING THE STUDY: Equine hoof canker is a chronic proliferative pododermatitis of as yet unknown aetiology. Like equine sarcoid disease, canker is a therapy-resistant disorder characterised by hyperkeratosis, acanthosis and a marked tendency to recur.
HYPOTHESIS: There is an association of sarcoid-inducing bovine papillomaviruses of types 1 and 2 (BPV-1, BPV-2) with hoof canker disease.
METHODS: Using PCR-based techniques, we assessed canker tissue, intact skin and/or peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of 25 canker-affected horses for the presence of sarcoid-associated BPV-1 and -2.
RESULTS: Conventional PCR revealed BPV-1/-2 DNA in 24/24 canker, 12/13 skin and 10/11 PBMC DNA isolates. Using inverse PCR, full-length BPV episomes were detected in 1/5 canker specimens. Sequencing of viral early and late genes amplified from canker, intact skin and PBMC DNA of 2 cases revealed an overall identity of 98% to BPV-1. Viral DNA loads amounted to ≤16 copies per cell in canker tissue and intact skin, and to ≤0.35 copies per PBMC, as determined by quantitative PCR. Using RT-PCR, the viral major oncogene E5 was shown to be transcribed in 2/4 canker tissue specimens and 5/7 PBMC isolates. Immunocapture PCR from 7 canker and 6 skin extract supernatants revealed capsomere-associated viral DNA in one canker and one skin sample. Hoof tissue, skin and PBMCs collected from 13 individuals with no signs of canker or BPV-related malignancies scored negative throughout the experiments.
CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that the observed presence of BPV-1/-2 in canker-affected horses is not coincidental but indicative of an active contribution to hoof canker disease.
POTENTIAL RELEVANCE: The use of antivirals and/or immune modulators may help improving canker therapy.

Abstract

REASONS FOR PERFORMING THE STUDY: Equine hoof canker is a chronic proliferative pododermatitis of as yet unknown aetiology. Like equine sarcoid disease, canker is a therapy-resistant disorder characterised by hyperkeratosis, acanthosis and a marked tendency to recur.
HYPOTHESIS: There is an association of sarcoid-inducing bovine papillomaviruses of types 1 and 2 (BPV-1, BPV-2) with hoof canker disease.
METHODS: Using PCR-based techniques, we assessed canker tissue, intact skin and/or peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of 25 canker-affected horses for the presence of sarcoid-associated BPV-1 and -2.
RESULTS: Conventional PCR revealed BPV-1/-2 DNA in 24/24 canker, 12/13 skin and 10/11 PBMC DNA isolates. Using inverse PCR, full-length BPV episomes were detected in 1/5 canker specimens. Sequencing of viral early and late genes amplified from canker, intact skin and PBMC DNA of 2 cases revealed an overall identity of 98% to BPV-1. Viral DNA loads amounted to ≤16 copies per cell in canker tissue and intact skin, and to ≤0.35 copies per PBMC, as determined by quantitative PCR. Using RT-PCR, the viral major oncogene E5 was shown to be transcribed in 2/4 canker tissue specimens and 5/7 PBMC isolates. Immunocapture PCR from 7 canker and 6 skin extract supernatants revealed capsomere-associated viral DNA in one canker and one skin sample. Hoof tissue, skin and PBMCs collected from 13 individuals with no signs of canker or BPV-related malignancies scored negative throughout the experiments.
CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that the observed presence of BPV-1/-2 in canker-affected horses is not coincidental but indicative of an active contribution to hoof canker disease.
POTENTIAL RELEVANCE: The use of antivirals and/or immune modulators may help improving canker therapy.

Statistics

Citations

17 citations in Web of Science®
18 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

0 downloads since deposited on 29 Aug 2017
0 downloads since 12 months

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Equine Department
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:29 Aug 2017 16:23
Last Modified:29 Aug 2017 16:23
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:0425-1644
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.2042-3306.2010.00147.x
PubMed ID:21592216

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Content: Published Version
Language: English
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 370kB
View at publisher