Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Social power and dimensions of self-control: Does power benefit initiatory self-control but impair inhibitory self-control?


Heller, Sonja; Borsay, Florence; Ullrich, Johannes (2017). Social power and dimensions of self-control: Does power benefit initiatory self-control but impair inhibitory self-control? Cogent Psychology, 4(1):1288351.

Abstract

People in power positions should be able to control their impulses and act in line with long-term goals. However, two influential theories disagree as to whether power is conducive or detrimental to exercising self-control. We propose to resolve this contradiction by distinguishing between initiatory (“start”) and inhibitory (“stop”) self-control components that may be differentially affected by social power. Ninety-five female participants were randomly assigned to either a powerful role (interviewer) or a powerless role (applicant) and interacted in a simulated job interview (i.e. a modified Trier Social Stress Test). They then completed two inhibitory (d2 Test of Attention and emotion regulation) and two initiatory (handgrip and creative problem-solving) self-control tasks. We tested the hypotheses that social power benefits task performance if the task requires start self-control but impairs task performance if the task requires stop self-control. Although the power manipulation strongly affected participants’ sense of power, it did not significantly affect self-control performance. Considering that this preregistered study had 80% power to detect an effect of d = 0.64, we conclude that the population effect size is smaller than that.

Abstract

People in power positions should be able to control their impulses and act in line with long-term goals. However, two influential theories disagree as to whether power is conducive or detrimental to exercising self-control. We propose to resolve this contradiction by distinguishing between initiatory (“start”) and inhibitory (“stop”) self-control components that may be differentially affected by social power. Ninety-five female participants were randomly assigned to either a powerful role (interviewer) or a powerless role (applicant) and interacted in a simulated job interview (i.e. a modified Trier Social Stress Test). They then completed two inhibitory (d2 Test of Attention and emotion regulation) and two initiatory (handgrip and creative problem-solving) self-control tasks. We tested the hypotheses that social power benefits task performance if the task requires start self-control but impairs task performance if the task requires stop self-control. Although the power manipulation strongly affected participants’ sense of power, it did not significantly affect self-control performance. Considering that this preregistered study had 80% power to detect an effect of d = 0.64, we conclude that the population effect size is smaller than that.

Statistics

Citations

Altmetrics

Downloads

5 downloads since deposited on 04 Sep 2017
5 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Uncontrolled Keywords:DoktoratPsych Erstautor
Language:English
Date:2017
Deposited On:04 Sep 2017 07:57
Last Modified:07 Sep 2017 06:25
Publisher:Cogent OA
ISSN:2331-1908
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1080/23311908.2017.1288351

Download

Download PDF  'Social power and dimensions of self-control: Does power benefit initiatory self-control but impair inhibitory self-control?'.
Preview
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 646kB
View at publisher
Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)