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Stability of gene expression in human T cells in different gravity environments is clustered in chromosomal region 11p15.4


Thiel, Cora S; Huge, Andreas; Hauschild, Swantje; Tauber, Svantje; Lauber, Beatrice A; Polzer, Jennifer; Paulsen, Katrin; Lier, Hartwin; Engelmann, Frank; Schmitz, Burkhard; Schütte, Andreas; Layer, Liliana E; Ullrich, Oliver (2017). Stability of gene expression in human T cells in different gravity environments is clustered in chromosomal region 11p15.4. npj Microgravity, 3(1):1-22.

Abstract

In the last decades, a plethora of in vitro studies with living human cells contributed a vast amount of knowledge about cellular and molecular effects of microgravity. Previous studies focused mostly on the identification of gravity-responsive genes, whereas a multi-platform analysis at an integrative level, which specifically evaluates the extent and robustness of transcriptional response to an altered gravity environment was not performed so far. Therefore, we investigated the stability of gene expression response in non-activated human Jurkat T lymphocytic cells in different gravity environments through the combination of parabolic flights with a suborbital ballistic rocket and 2D clinostat and centrifuge experiments, using strict controls for excluding all possible other factors of influence. We revealed an overall high stability of gene expression in microgravity and identified olfactory gene expression in the chromosomal region 11p15.4 as particularly robust to altered gravity. We identified that classical reference genes ABCA5, GAPDH, HPRT1, PLA2G4A, and RPL13A were stably expressed in all tested gravity conditions and platforms, while ABCA5 and GAPDH were also known to be stably expressed in U937 cells in all gravity conditions. In summary, 10–20% of all transcripts remained totally unchanged in any gravitational environment tested (between 10−4 and 9 g), 20–40% remained unchanged in microgravity (between 10−4 and 10−2 g) and 97–99% were not significantly altered in microgravity if strict exclusion criteria were applied. Therefore, we suppose a high stability of gene expression in microgravity. Comparison with other stressors suggests that microgravity alters gene expression homeostasis not stronger than other environmental factors.

Abstract

In the last decades, a plethora of in vitro studies with living human cells contributed a vast amount of knowledge about cellular and molecular effects of microgravity. Previous studies focused mostly on the identification of gravity-responsive genes, whereas a multi-platform analysis at an integrative level, which specifically evaluates the extent and robustness of transcriptional response to an altered gravity environment was not performed so far. Therefore, we investigated the stability of gene expression response in non-activated human Jurkat T lymphocytic cells in different gravity environments through the combination of parabolic flights with a suborbital ballistic rocket and 2D clinostat and centrifuge experiments, using strict controls for excluding all possible other factors of influence. We revealed an overall high stability of gene expression in microgravity and identified olfactory gene expression in the chromosomal region 11p15.4 as particularly robust to altered gravity. We identified that classical reference genes ABCA5, GAPDH, HPRT1, PLA2G4A, and RPL13A were stably expressed in all tested gravity conditions and platforms, while ABCA5 and GAPDH were also known to be stably expressed in U937 cells in all gravity conditions. In summary, 10–20% of all transcripts remained totally unchanged in any gravitational environment tested (between 10−4 and 9 g), 20–40% remained unchanged in microgravity (between 10−4 and 10−2 g) and 97–99% were not significantly altered in microgravity if strict exclusion criteria were applied. Therefore, we suppose a high stability of gene expression in microgravity. Comparison with other stressors suggests that microgravity alters gene expression homeostasis not stronger than other environmental factors.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Anatomy
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:20 July 2017
Deposited On:07 Sep 2017 14:24
Last Modified:07 Sep 2017 14:24
Publisher:Nature Publishing Group
ISSN:2373-8065
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1038/s41526-017-0028-6

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