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Real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging: methods and applications


Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Sitaram, Ranganatha; Josephs, Oliver; Veit, Ralf; Scharnowski, Frank; Goebel, Rainer; Birbaumer, Niels; Deichmann, Ralf; Mathiak, Klaus (2007). Real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging: methods and applications. Magnetic Resonance Imaging, 25(6):989-1003.

Abstract

Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been limited by time-consuming data analysis and a low signal-to-noise ratio, impeding online analysis. Recent advances in acquisition techniques, computational power and algorithms increased the sensitivity and speed of fMRI significantly, making real-time analysis and display of fMRI data feasible. So far, most reports have focused on the technical aspects of real-time fMRI (rtfMRI). Here, we provide an overview of the different major areas of applications that became possible with rtfMRI: online analysis of single-subject data provides immediate quality assurance and functional localizers guiding the main fMRI experiment or surgical interventions. In teaching, rtfMRI naturally combines all essential parts of a neuroimaging experiment, such as experimental design, data acquisition and analysis, while adding a high level of interactivity. Thus, the learning of essential knowledge required to conduct functional imaging experiments is facilitated. rtfMRI allows for brain-computer interfaces (BCI) with a high spatial and temporal resolution and whole-brain coverage. Recent studies have shown that such BCI can be used to provide online feedback of the blood-oxygen-level-dependent signal and to learn the self-regulation of local brain activity. Preliminary evidence suggests that this local self-regulation can be used as a new paradigm in cognitive neuroscience to study brain plasticity and the functional relevance of brain areas, even being potentially applicable for psychophysiological treatment.

Abstract

Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been limited by time-consuming data analysis and a low signal-to-noise ratio, impeding online analysis. Recent advances in acquisition techniques, computational power and algorithms increased the sensitivity and speed of fMRI significantly, making real-time analysis and display of fMRI data feasible. So far, most reports have focused on the technical aspects of real-time fMRI (rtfMRI). Here, we provide an overview of the different major areas of applications that became possible with rtfMRI: online analysis of single-subject data provides immediate quality assurance and functional localizers guiding the main fMRI experiment or surgical interventions. In teaching, rtfMRI naturally combines all essential parts of a neuroimaging experiment, such as experimental design, data acquisition and analysis, while adding a high level of interactivity. Thus, the learning of essential knowledge required to conduct functional imaging experiments is facilitated. rtfMRI allows for brain-computer interfaces (BCI) with a high spatial and temporal resolution and whole-brain coverage. Recent studies have shown that such BCI can be used to provide online feedback of the blood-oxygen-level-dependent signal and to learn the self-regulation of local brain activity. Preliminary evidence suggests that this local self-regulation can be used as a new paradigm in cognitive neuroscience to study brain plasticity and the functional relevance of brain areas, even being potentially applicable for psychophysiological treatment.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Psychiatric University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Psychiatry, Psychotherapy, and Psychosomatics
04 Faculty of Medicine > Neuroscience Center Zurich
04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:July 2007
Deposited On:25 Sep 2017 15:12
Last Modified:26 Sep 2017 07:37
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0730-725X
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.mri.2007.02.007
PubMed ID:17451904

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