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Impact of heat treatment on antigen detection in sera of Angiostrongylus vasorum infected dogs


Gillis-Germitsch, Nina; Schnyder, Manuela (2017). Impact of heat treatment on antigen detection in sera of Angiostrongylus vasorum infected dogs. Parasites & Vectors, 10(1):421.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: In the last decade serological tests for detection of circulating Angiostrongylus vasorum antigen and specific antibodies have been developed and adopted for individual diagnosis and epidemiological studies in dogs. Although confirmed positive at necropsy, antigen detection was not possible in single experimentally, as well as naturally infected dogs, possibly due to immune complex formation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of heat treatment on detection of A. vasorum antigen in sera of experimentally (n = 21, 119 follow-up sera) and naturally (n = 18) infected animals. In addition, sera of dogs showing clinical signs consistent with angiostrongylosis (n = 10), of randomly selected dogs (n = 58) and of dogs with other parasitic infections (n = 15) were evaluated. Sera were subjected to heat treatment at 100 °C after addition of 0.5 M EDTA (dilution 1:5) and tested with ELISAs for detection of circulating A. vasorum antigen before and after treatment.
RESULTS: Between 5 and 11 weeks post-inoculation (wpi) the percentage of positive untreated samples (experimentally infected dogs) increased over time from 33.3 to 90%. Single samples were still negative between 12 and 15 wpi. Overall, between 5 and 15 wpi, 50.6% (45/89) of the available samples were seropositive. From 3 to 6 wpi EDTA/heat treatment caused a change in 8/34 (23.5%) of the samples, with most (n = 6, 17.6%) converting from positive to negative. In contrast, from 7 to 10 wpi, treatment induced a change in 19/52 (36.5%) samples, with all but one converting from negative to positive. Thirteen of 18 naturally infected dogs were antigen positive before and 15 after EDTA/heat treatment, respectively. Untreated samples of 3 dogs with suspected angiostrongylosis were antigen positive, of which only one remained positive after EDTA/heat treatment. One of 58 untreated random samples was antigen positive; this sample became negative after treatment, while another turned positive. One of 15 dogs infected with other parasites than A. vasorum was positive before but negative after treatment.
CONCLUSION: Although heat treatment improves A. vasorum antigen detection between 7 and 10 wpi by immune complex disruption, we do not recommend systematic pretreating sera because of reduced antigen detection between 3 and 6 wpi and impairment of antibody detection, if performed contemporaneously.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: In the last decade serological tests for detection of circulating Angiostrongylus vasorum antigen and specific antibodies have been developed and adopted for individual diagnosis and epidemiological studies in dogs. Although confirmed positive at necropsy, antigen detection was not possible in single experimentally, as well as naturally infected dogs, possibly due to immune complex formation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of heat treatment on detection of A. vasorum antigen in sera of experimentally (n = 21, 119 follow-up sera) and naturally (n = 18) infected animals. In addition, sera of dogs showing clinical signs consistent with angiostrongylosis (n = 10), of randomly selected dogs (n = 58) and of dogs with other parasitic infections (n = 15) were evaluated. Sera were subjected to heat treatment at 100 °C after addition of 0.5 M EDTA (dilution 1:5) and tested with ELISAs for detection of circulating A. vasorum antigen before and after treatment.
RESULTS: Between 5 and 11 weeks post-inoculation (wpi) the percentage of positive untreated samples (experimentally infected dogs) increased over time from 33.3 to 90%. Single samples were still negative between 12 and 15 wpi. Overall, between 5 and 15 wpi, 50.6% (45/89) of the available samples were seropositive. From 3 to 6 wpi EDTA/heat treatment caused a change in 8/34 (23.5%) of the samples, with most (n = 6, 17.6%) converting from positive to negative. In contrast, from 7 to 10 wpi, treatment induced a change in 19/52 (36.5%) samples, with all but one converting from negative to positive. Thirteen of 18 naturally infected dogs were antigen positive before and 15 after EDTA/heat treatment, respectively. Untreated samples of 3 dogs with suspected angiostrongylosis were antigen positive, of which only one remained positive after EDTA/heat treatment. One of 58 untreated random samples was antigen positive; this sample became negative after treatment, while another turned positive. One of 15 dogs infected with other parasites than A. vasorum was positive before but negative after treatment.
CONCLUSION: Although heat treatment improves A. vasorum antigen detection between 7 and 10 wpi by immune complex disruption, we do not recommend systematic pretreating sera because of reduced antigen detection between 3 and 6 wpi and impairment of antibody detection, if performed contemporaneously.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Parasitology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Parasitology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
600 Technology
Uncontrolled Keywords:Angiostrongylus vasorum; Antigen; Dog; ELISA; Heat treatment; Immune complexes; Serology; Serum
Language:English
Date:2017
Deposited On:26 Sep 2017 14:20
Last Modified:26 Sep 2017 14:20
Publisher:BioMed Central
ISSN:1756-3305
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1186/s13071-017-2366-3
PubMed ID:28915846

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