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Maize food allergy: a double-blind placebo-controlled study


Scibilia, J; Pastorello, E A; Zisa, G; Ottolenghi, A; Ballmer-Weber, B; Pravettoni, V; Scovena, E; Robino, A; Ortolani, C (2008). Maize food allergy: a double-blind placebo-controlled study. Clinical and Experimental Allergy, 38(12):1943-1949.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Maize allergy is not very common especially in Europe. The number of studies that address IgE mediated maize allergy is all too few. OBJECTIVE: Evaluate subjects with a history of maize allergy by double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge; identify the spectrum of symptoms manifested during challenge; determine the lowest provocation dose (PD) during challenge; determine the performance characteristics of maize skin prick test and specific IgE. METHODS: Twenty-seven patients with a history of maize allergy were enrolled to be evaluated by skin test, specific IgE and double-blind placebo-controlled maize challenge. RESULTS: Forty-eight percent of the patients were challenge positive. PD range was 0.1-25 g. Fifty-four percent of the maize allergic subjects had a PD that was < or = 2.5 g; two subjects reacted to 100 mg of maize. Comparison of maize specific IgE levels and skin test results to the challenge results revealed the following (specific IgE level/skin testing): sensitivity 1.00/0.846, specificity 0.077/0.384, positive predictive value 0.520/0.579, and negative predictive value 1.00/0.714. CONCLUSION: Maize is a cause of IgE-mediated allergic reactions to foods in adults and children. Nearly half of the subjects recruited were confirmed by challenge to be allergic to maize. Twenty-three percent of the positive challenge patients manifested symptoms that involved two organ systems, thus fulfilling the criteria for maize induced anaphylaxis. Maize is allergenic and can pose a risk for symptomatic food allergy at a dose of 100 mg.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Maize allergy is not very common especially in Europe. The number of studies that address IgE mediated maize allergy is all too few. OBJECTIVE: Evaluate subjects with a history of maize allergy by double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge; identify the spectrum of symptoms manifested during challenge; determine the lowest provocation dose (PD) during challenge; determine the performance characteristics of maize skin prick test and specific IgE. METHODS: Twenty-seven patients with a history of maize allergy were enrolled to be evaluated by skin test, specific IgE and double-blind placebo-controlled maize challenge. RESULTS: Forty-eight percent of the patients were challenge positive. PD range was 0.1-25 g. Fifty-four percent of the maize allergic subjects had a PD that was < or = 2.5 g; two subjects reacted to 100 mg of maize. Comparison of maize specific IgE levels and skin test results to the challenge results revealed the following (specific IgE level/skin testing): sensitivity 1.00/0.846, specificity 0.077/0.384, positive predictive value 0.520/0.579, and negative predictive value 1.00/0.714. CONCLUSION: Maize is a cause of IgE-mediated allergic reactions to foods in adults and children. Nearly half of the subjects recruited were confirmed by challenge to be allergic to maize. Twenty-three percent of the positive challenge patients manifested symptoms that involved two organ systems, thus fulfilling the criteria for maize induced anaphylaxis. Maize is allergenic and can pose a risk for symptomatic food allergy at a dose of 100 mg.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Dermatology Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:December 2008
Deposited On:27 Feb 2009 11:15
Last Modified:06 Dec 2017 18:16
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0954-7894
Additional Information:The definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2222.2008.03094.x
PubMed ID:18778272

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