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A pilot study investigating the association between chronic bilateral vestibulopathy and components of a clinical functional assessment tool


Swanenburg, Jaap; Zurbrugg, Aron; Straumann, Dominik; Hegemann, Stefan C A; Palla, Antonella; de Bruin, Eling D (2017). A pilot study investigating the association between chronic bilateral vestibulopathy and components of a clinical functional assessment tool. Physiotherapy theory and practice, 33(6):454-461.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: This study aimed to analyze the association between prospectively assessed falls and functional abilities in patients with bilateral vestibulopathy (BVP).
METHODS: Nineteen BVP patients had functional abilities assessed at baseline with the expanded timed get-up-and-go (ETGUG) test. Falls were prospectively recorded with a monthly "fall calendar" over a one-year period. Association between baseline functional abilities and falls was evaluated by Mann-Whitney U testing. Logistic regression was applied to describe the relationship between falls and functional abilities. Area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC) was used predicting falls based on gait speed.
RESULTS: Eight (45%) of 18 patients (61.11 ± 15.19 years, 12 male) reported 19 falls. Fallers had a significantly faster preferred gait speed (p = 0.03) in the fifth component of the ETGUG. Preferred gait speed was a significant factor in the prediction of falls model (odds ratio = 2.00, p = 0.05, CI = 1.00/4.00 per 10 cm/s). ACU was 0.80 and the cutoff score of 1.35m/s (sensitivity = 75%, specificity = 70%) in predicting falls.
DISCUSSION: BVP patients classified as fallers demonstrated significant faster gait speed after a turning maneuver. Future studies in larger BVP patient samples are needed to refute or confirm our findings.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: This study aimed to analyze the association between prospectively assessed falls and functional abilities in patients with bilateral vestibulopathy (BVP).
METHODS: Nineteen BVP patients had functional abilities assessed at baseline with the expanded timed get-up-and-go (ETGUG) test. Falls were prospectively recorded with a monthly "fall calendar" over a one-year period. Association between baseline functional abilities and falls was evaluated by Mann-Whitney U testing. Logistic regression was applied to describe the relationship between falls and functional abilities. Area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC) was used predicting falls based on gait speed.
RESULTS: Eight (45%) of 18 patients (61.11 ± 15.19 years, 12 male) reported 19 falls. Fallers had a significantly faster preferred gait speed (p = 0.03) in the fifth component of the ETGUG. Preferred gait speed was a significant factor in the prediction of falls model (odds ratio = 2.00, p = 0.05, CI = 1.00/4.00 per 10 cm/s). ACU was 0.80 and the cutoff score of 1.35m/s (sensitivity = 75%, specificity = 70%) in predicting falls.
DISCUSSION: BVP patients classified as fallers demonstrated significant faster gait speed after a turning maneuver. Future studies in larger BVP patient samples are needed to refute or confirm our findings.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Otorhinolaryngology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Uncontrolled Keywords:Falls, gait, prospective, validity, vestibular loss
Language:English
Date:June 2017
Deposited On:20 Oct 2017 15:43
Last Modified:19 Feb 2018 08:58
Publisher:Informa Healthcare
ISSN:0959-3985
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1080/09593985.2017.1323362
PubMed ID:28594306

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