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Continuous coloured light altered human brain haemodynamics and oxygenation assessed by systemic physiology augmented functional near-infrared spectroscopy


Metz, A J; Klein, S D; Scholkmann, F; Wolf, Ursula (2017). Continuous coloured light altered human brain haemodynamics and oxygenation assessed by systemic physiology augmented functional near-infrared spectroscopy. Scientific Reports, 7(1):10027.

Abstract

Exposure to artificial coloured light is unavoidable in our modern life, but we are only just beginning to understand the impact of coloured light on human physiology. The aim of the present study was to determine effects of coloured light exposure on human systemic and brain physiology using systemic physiology augmented functional near-infrared spectroscopy (SPA-fNIRS). We measured changes in haemoglobin concentrations and tissue oxygen saturation in the left and right prefrontal cortices (L-PFC, R-PFC) by fNIRS, and also recorded skin conductance (SC), partial pressure of end-tidal CO2 (PETCO2), and heart-rate variability variables. 17 healthy adults (median age: 29 years, range: 25-65 years, 6 women) were exposed to blue, red, green, or yellow light for 10 minutes. Pre-light and post-light conditions were in darkness. In the L-PFC the yellow evoked a brain activation. SC and PETCO2 did not change during any of the coloured light exposures, but SC increased and PETCO2 decreased for all colours (except green) in the post-light period. Changes in L-PFC haemoglobin concentration were also observed during the post-light period but have to be interpreted with care, because heart rate and SC increased while PETCO2 decreased. The detected effects are potentially of high relevance for choosing room lighting and may possibly be applied therapeutically.

Abstract

Exposure to artificial coloured light is unavoidable in our modern life, but we are only just beginning to understand the impact of coloured light on human physiology. The aim of the present study was to determine effects of coloured light exposure on human systemic and brain physiology using systemic physiology augmented functional near-infrared spectroscopy (SPA-fNIRS). We measured changes in haemoglobin concentrations and tissue oxygen saturation in the left and right prefrontal cortices (L-PFC, R-PFC) by fNIRS, and also recorded skin conductance (SC), partial pressure of end-tidal CO2 (PETCO2), and heart-rate variability variables. 17 healthy adults (median age: 29 years, range: 25-65 years, 6 women) were exposed to blue, red, green, or yellow light for 10 minutes. Pre-light and post-light conditions were in darkness. In the L-PFC the yellow evoked a brain activation. SC and PETCO2 did not change during any of the coloured light exposures, but SC increased and PETCO2 decreased for all colours (except green) in the post-light period. Changes in L-PFC haemoglobin concentration were also observed during the post-light period but have to be interpreted with care, because heart rate and SC increased while PETCO2 decreased. The detected effects are potentially of high relevance for choosing room lighting and may possibly be applied therapeutically.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neonatology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:30 August 2017
Deposited On:20 Oct 2017 15:23
Last Modified:19 Feb 2018 08:58
Publisher:Nature Publishing Group
ISSN:2045-2322
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-09970-z
PubMed ID:28855556

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