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Non-neuronal evoked and spontaneous hemodynamic changes in the anterior temporal region of the human head may lead to misinterpretations of functional near-infrared spectroscopy signals


Zimeo Morais, Guilherne Augusto; Scholkmann, Felix; Balardin, Joana Bisol; Furucho, Rogério Akira; de Paula, Renan Costa Vieira; Biazoli, Claudinei Eduardo; Sato, João Ricardo (2018). Non-neuronal evoked and spontaneous hemodynamic changes in the anterior temporal region of the human head may lead to misinterpretations of functional near-infrared spectroscopy signals. Neurophotonics, 5(1):011002.

Abstract

Several functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) studies report their findings based on changes of a single chromophore, usually concentration changes of oxygenated hemoglobin ([[Formula: see text]]) or deoxygenated hemoglobin (HHb). However, influence of physiological actions may differ depending on which element is considered and the assumption that the chosen measure correlates with the neural response of interest might not hold. By assessing the correlation between [[Formula: see text]] and [HHb] in task-evoked activity as well as resting-state data, we identified a spatial dependency of non-neuronal hemodynamic changes in the anterior temporal region of the human head. Our findings support the importance of reporting and discussing fNIRS outcomes obtained with both chromophores ([[Formula: see text]] and [HHb]), in particular, for studies concerning the anterior temporal region of the human head. This practice should help to achieve a physiologically correct interpretation of the results when no measurements with short-distance channels are available while employing continuous-wave fNIRS systems.

Abstract

Several functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) studies report their findings based on changes of a single chromophore, usually concentration changes of oxygenated hemoglobin ([[Formula: see text]]) or deoxygenated hemoglobin (HHb). However, influence of physiological actions may differ depending on which element is considered and the assumption that the chosen measure correlates with the neural response of interest might not hold. By assessing the correlation between [[Formula: see text]] and [HHb] in task-evoked activity as well as resting-state data, we identified a spatial dependency of non-neuronal hemodynamic changes in the anterior temporal region of the human head. Our findings support the importance of reporting and discussing fNIRS outcomes obtained with both chromophores ([[Formula: see text]] and [HHb]), in particular, for studies concerning the anterior temporal region of the human head. This practice should help to achieve a physiologically correct interpretation of the results when no measurements with short-distance channels are available while employing continuous-wave fNIRS systems.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neonatology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Uncontrolled Keywords:extracerebral signal contamination; functional near-infrared spectroscopy; optical neuroimaging; scalp blood flow; superficial temporal vessels; temporal lobe; temporalis muscle
Language:English
Date:January 2018
Deposited On:20 Oct 2017 15:15
Last Modified:20 Feb 2018 08:54
Publisher:SPIE - International Society for Optical Engineering
ISSN:2329-423X
OA Status:Hybrid
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1117/1.NPh.5.1.011002
PubMed ID:28840166

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