Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Vitamin D status in growing dairy goats and sheep: influence of UVB radiation on bone metabolism and calcium homeostasis


Nemeth, Malin Veronique. Vitamin D status in growing dairy goats and sheep: influence of UVB radiation on bone metabolism and calcium homeostasis. 2017, University of Zurich, Vetsuisse Faculty.

Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate how controlled UVB irradiation in combination with reduced nutritional vitamin D (vitD) supply affects vitD status and Ca metabolism of growing goats and sheep. The hypothesis was that, like dairy cows, goats and sheep are able to compensate for the missing nutritional supply of vitD through endogenous production in the skin, with the consequence of a high vitD status and a balanced Ca homeostasis. Sixteen lambs and 14 goat kids aged 3 and a half months were housed in an UVB free environment and fed hay and a vitD-free concentrate over a period of 13 wk. One group of each species was exposed to UVB lamps daily during individual feeding; the other groups served as controls. Serum, urine, and feces samples were taken at the start and at a monthly interval. Serum was analyzed for vitD metabolites, bone markers, growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor I, Ca, and P. Apparent digestibility and urinary excretion of Ca and P were determined. The left metatarsus was analyzed by peripheral quantitative computer tomography for bone mineral density before starting and at the end of the trial. In wk 13, all animals were slaughtered and samples of skin, rumen, duodenum, kidney, and bone (metatarsus) were collected. Content of sterols of vitD synthesis in the skin, Ca flux rates in rumen and duodenum, expression of vitD receptor in duodenum and kidney, renal and intestinal gene expression of Ca transport proteins, and renal enzymes related to vitD metabolism were determined. The UVB exposure led to lower 7-dehydrocholesterol content in the skin and a better vitD status (higher serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D), but no signs of vitD deficiency were seen in the control groups and no effect of irradiation was detected in the analyzed parameters of Ca homeostasis. Differences between the 2 species were detected: lambs had a higher increase of bone mineral density, lower values of bone markers, growth hormone, and insulin-like growth factor I in serum and higher tachysterol and lower lumisterol content in skin compared with goat kids. The results indicated that growing lambs and goat kids are able to compensate for a vitD-reduced diet by cutaneous vitD synthesis when exposed to UVB irradiation and therefore to keep a high vitD status. In contrast, when a reduced vitD diet is combined with missing UVB exposure, the vitD status drops, but the experimental time was probably too short to induce a vitD deficiency or an effect on Ca homeostasis.

Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate how controlled UVB irradiation in combination with reduced nutritional vitamin D (vitD) supply affects vitD status and Ca metabolism of growing goats and sheep. The hypothesis was that, like dairy cows, goats and sheep are able to compensate for the missing nutritional supply of vitD through endogenous production in the skin, with the consequence of a high vitD status and a balanced Ca homeostasis. Sixteen lambs and 14 goat kids aged 3 and a half months were housed in an UVB free environment and fed hay and a vitD-free concentrate over a period of 13 wk. One group of each species was exposed to UVB lamps daily during individual feeding; the other groups served as controls. Serum, urine, and feces samples were taken at the start and at a monthly interval. Serum was analyzed for vitD metabolites, bone markers, growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor I, Ca, and P. Apparent digestibility and urinary excretion of Ca and P were determined. The left metatarsus was analyzed by peripheral quantitative computer tomography for bone mineral density before starting and at the end of the trial. In wk 13, all animals were slaughtered and samples of skin, rumen, duodenum, kidney, and bone (metatarsus) were collected. Content of sterols of vitD synthesis in the skin, Ca flux rates in rumen and duodenum, expression of vitD receptor in duodenum and kidney, renal and intestinal gene expression of Ca transport proteins, and renal enzymes related to vitD metabolism were determined. The UVB exposure led to lower 7-dehydrocholesterol content in the skin and a better vitD status (higher serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D), but no signs of vitD deficiency were seen in the control groups and no effect of irradiation was detected in the analyzed parameters of Ca homeostasis. Differences between the 2 species were detected: lambs had a higher increase of bone mineral density, lower values of bone markers, growth hormone, and insulin-like growth factor I in serum and higher tachysterol and lower lumisterol content in skin compared with goat kids. The results indicated that growing lambs and goat kids are able to compensate for a vitD-reduced diet by cutaneous vitD synthesis when exposed to UVB irradiation and therefore to keep a high vitD status. In contrast, when a reduced vitD diet is combined with missing UVB exposure, the vitD status drops, but the experimental time was probably too short to induce a vitD deficiency or an effect on Ca homeostasis.

Statistics

Downloads

5 downloads since deposited on 27 Oct 2017
5 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Dissertation
Referees:Liesegang Annette
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Animal Nutrition
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Center for Applied Biotechnology and Molecular Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Language:English
Date:2017
Deposited On:27 Oct 2017 11:18
Last Modified:09 Dec 2017 03:05
Number of Pages:33
Related URLs:http://www.recherche-portal.ch/ZAD:default_scope:ebi01_prod011056647 (Library Catalogue)

Download

Download PDF  'Vitamin D status in growing dairy goats and sheep: influence of UVB radiation on bone metabolism and calcium homeostasis'.
Preview
Filetype: PDF
Size: 373kB