Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

The effect of sampling rate and lowpass filters on saccades - A modeling approach


Mack, David J; Belfanti, Sandro; Schwarz, Urs (2017). The effect of sampling rate and lowpass filters on saccades - A modeling approach. Behavior Research Methods, 49(6):2146-2162.

Abstract

The study of eye movements has become popular in many fields of science. However, using the preprocessed output of an eye tracker without scrutiny can lead to low-quality or even erroneous data. For example, the sampling rate of the eye tracker influences saccadic peak velocity, while inadequate filters fail to suppress noise or introduce artifacts. Despite previously published guiding values, most filter choices still seem motivated by a trial-and-error approach, and a thorough analysis of filter effects is missing. Therefore, we developed a simple and easy-to-use saccade model that incorporates measured amplitude-velocity main sequences and produces saccades with a similar frequency content to real saccades. We also derived a velocity divergence measure to rate deviations between velocity profiles. In total, we simulated 155 saccades ranging from 0.5° to 60° and subjected them to different sampling rates, noise compositions, and various filter settings. The final goal was to compile a list with the best filter settings for each of these conditions. Replicating previous findings, we observed reduced peak velocities at lower sampling rates. However, this effect was highly non-linear over amplitudes and increasingly stronger for smaller saccades. Interpolating the data to a higher sampling rate significantly reduced this effect. We hope that our model and the velocity divergence measure will be used to provide a quickly accessible ground truth without the need for recording and manually labeling saccades. The comprehensive list of filters allows one to choose the correct filter for analyzing saccade data without resorting to trial-and-error methods.

Abstract

The study of eye movements has become popular in many fields of science. However, using the preprocessed output of an eye tracker without scrutiny can lead to low-quality or even erroneous data. For example, the sampling rate of the eye tracker influences saccadic peak velocity, while inadequate filters fail to suppress noise or introduce artifacts. Despite previously published guiding values, most filter choices still seem motivated by a trial-and-error approach, and a thorough analysis of filter effects is missing. Therefore, we developed a simple and easy-to-use saccade model that incorporates measured amplitude-velocity main sequences and produces saccades with a similar frequency content to real saccades. We also derived a velocity divergence measure to rate deviations between velocity profiles. In total, we simulated 155 saccades ranging from 0.5° to 60° and subjected them to different sampling rates, noise compositions, and various filter settings. The final goal was to compile a list with the best filter settings for each of these conditions. Replicating previous findings, we observed reduced peak velocities at lower sampling rates. However, this effect was highly non-linear over amplitudes and increasingly stronger for smaller saccades. Interpolating the data to a higher sampling rate significantly reduced this effect. We hope that our model and the velocity divergence measure will be used to provide a quickly accessible ground truth without the need for recording and manually labeling saccades. The comprehensive list of filters allows one to choose the correct filter for analyzing saccade data without resorting to trial-and-error methods.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
3 citations in Web of Science®
2 citations in Scopus®
4 citations in Microsoft Academic
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:27 January 2017
Deposited On:22 Dec 2017 11:12
Last Modified:19 Feb 2018 09:07
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:1554-351X
OA Status:Closed
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.3758/s13428-016-0848-4
PubMed ID:28130727

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

Get full-text in a library