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The rise of urban fox population in Switzerland


Gloor, Sandra; Bontadina, Fabio; Hegglin, D; Deplazes, Peter; Breitenmoser, Urs (2001). The rise of urban fox population in Switzerland. Mammalian Biology - Zeitschrift für Säugetierkunde, 66:155-164.

Abstract

Since 1985 increasingly more foxes have been recorded from cities in Switzerland. The inquiry of town officials showed that foxes are observed in 28 out of the 30 largest Swiss cities today and breeding dens are known in 20 of these cities. Urban foxes are observed more often than one would expect in larger cities than in smaller towns. In Ziirich, the largest city in Switzerland, urban foxes were very scarce until the early 1980s. According to the hunting statistics, from 1985 onwards, there was a drastic increase in the urban fox population. I n the adjacent rural areas, there was also a clear but less extreme increase in the fox population from 1984 onwards due to successful vaccination campaigns against rabies. As an explanation for the presence of foxes in human settlements we suggest two alternative hypotheses, which focus either on the population pressure in the rural areas or on the behavioural adaptations of urban foxes. The presence of foxes in urban areas influences behaviour and attitudes of people towards urban wildlife and it has a consequences for the management of foxes and the treatment of zoonoses such as rabies and the alveolar echinococcosis.

Abstract

Since 1985 increasingly more foxes have been recorded from cities in Switzerland. The inquiry of town officials showed that foxes are observed in 28 out of the 30 largest Swiss cities today and breeding dens are known in 20 of these cities. Urban foxes are observed more often than one would expect in larger cities than in smaller towns. In Ziirich, the largest city in Switzerland, urban foxes were very scarce until the early 1980s. According to the hunting statistics, from 1985 onwards, there was a drastic increase in the urban fox population. I n the adjacent rural areas, there was also a clear but less extreme increase in the fox population from 1984 onwards due to successful vaccination campaigns against rabies. As an explanation for the presence of foxes in human settlements we suggest two alternative hypotheses, which focus either on the population pressure in the rural areas or on the behavioural adaptations of urban foxes. The presence of foxes in urban areas influences behaviour and attitudes of people towards urban wildlife and it has a consequences for the management of foxes and the treatment of zoonoses such as rabies and the alveolar echinococcosis.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Parasitology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Parasitology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
600 Technology
Language:English
Date:2001
Deposited On:03 Nov 2017 14:56
Last Modified:09 Dec 2017 03:14
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1616-5047

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