Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Psychobiological impact of ethnic discrimination in Turkish immigrants living in Germany


Fischer, Susanne; Nater, Urs M; Strahler, Jana; Skoluda, Nadine; Dieterich, Leander; Oezcan, Orgun; Mewes, Ricarda (2017). Psychobiological impact of ethnic discrimination in Turkish immigrants living in Germany. Stress, 20(2):167-174.

Abstract

Perceived ethnic discrimination has a negative impact on health. One of the key mechanisms may be a dysregulation of stress-responsive systems. Our aims were to investigate whether (1) acute face-to-face ethnic discrimination induces a stress response, and (2) to compare long-term endocrine functioning between immigrants and nonimmigrants. 30 male Turkish immigrants living in Germany underwent an ethnic discrimination condition and a control condition in the laboratory. Perceived ethnic discrimination, stress, salivary alpha-amylase and cortisol were measured four times. Heart rate and electrodermal activity were measured continuously. In addition, hair samples were collected from immigrants and 25 male nonimmigrants to determine long-term cortisol concentrations. Immigrants showed increases in perceived ethnic discrimination, stress, heart rate, alpha-amylase and cortisol during the ethnic discrimination condition. Immigrants had significantly lower hair cortisol concentrations than nonimmigrants. These findings suggest that acute ethnic discrimination elicits a psychobiological stress response. Abnormalities in long-term endocrine functioning in ethnic minorities may set the stage for the development of stress-related illnesses. Lay summary The present study found that racial discrimination of Turkish immigrants induced both psychological and physiological stress responses in the laboratory. Immigrants showed lower hair cortisol concentrations than nonimmigrants, indicating a dysregulated biological stress system.

Abstract

Perceived ethnic discrimination has a negative impact on health. One of the key mechanisms may be a dysregulation of stress-responsive systems. Our aims were to investigate whether (1) acute face-to-face ethnic discrimination induces a stress response, and (2) to compare long-term endocrine functioning between immigrants and nonimmigrants. 30 male Turkish immigrants living in Germany underwent an ethnic discrimination condition and a control condition in the laboratory. Perceived ethnic discrimination, stress, salivary alpha-amylase and cortisol were measured four times. Heart rate and electrodermal activity were measured continuously. In addition, hair samples were collected from immigrants and 25 male nonimmigrants to determine long-term cortisol concentrations. Immigrants showed increases in perceived ethnic discrimination, stress, heart rate, alpha-amylase and cortisol during the ethnic discrimination condition. Immigrants had significantly lower hair cortisol concentrations than nonimmigrants. These findings suggest that acute ethnic discrimination elicits a psychobiological stress response. Abnormalities in long-term endocrine functioning in ethnic minorities may set the stage for the development of stress-related illnesses. Lay summary The present study found that racial discrimination of Turkish immigrants induced both psychological and physiological stress responses in the laboratory. Immigrants showed lower hair cortisol concentrations than nonimmigrants, indicating a dysregulated biological stress system.

Statistics

Citations

1 citation in Web of Science®
1 citation in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Date:March 2017
Deposited On:22 Nov 2017 15:19
Last Modified:09 Dec 2017 03:35
Publisher:Taylor & Francis
ISSN:1025-3890
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1080/10253890.2017.1296430
PubMed ID:28276806

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher