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Loss of HIF-1α in natural killer cells inhibits tumour growth by stimulating non-productive angiogenesis


Krzywinska, Ewelina; Kantari-Mimoun, Chahrazade; Kerdiles, Yann; Sobecki, Michal; Isagawa, Takayuki; Gotthardt, Dagmar; Castells, Magali; Haubold, Johannes; Millien, Corinne; Viel, Thomas; Tavitian, Bertrand; Takeda, Norihiko; Fandrey, Joachim; Vivier, Eric; Sexl, Veronika; Stockmann, Christian (2017). Loss of HIF-1α in natural killer cells inhibits tumour growth by stimulating non-productive angiogenesis. Nature Communications, 8(1):1597.

Abstract

Productive angiogenesis, a prerequisite for tumour growth, depends on the balanced release of angiogenic and angiostatic factors by different cell types within hypoxic tumours. Natural killer (NK) cells kill cancer cells and infiltrate hypoxic tumour areas. Cellular adaptation to low oxygen is mediated by Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs). We found that deletion of HIF-1α in NK cells inhibited tumour growth despite impaired tumour cell killing. Tumours developing in these conditions were characterised by a high-density network of immature vessels, severe haemorrhage, increased hypoxia, and facilitated metastasis due to non-productive angiogenesis. Loss of HIF-1α in NK cells increased the bioavailability of the major angiogenic cytokine vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) by decreasing the infiltration of NK cells that express angiostatic soluble VEGFR-1. In summary, this identifies the hypoxic response in NK cells as an inhibitor of VEGF-driven angiogenesis, yet, this promotes tumour growth by allowing the formation of functionally improved vessels.

Abstract

Productive angiogenesis, a prerequisite for tumour growth, depends on the balanced release of angiogenic and angiostatic factors by different cell types within hypoxic tumours. Natural killer (NK) cells kill cancer cells and infiltrate hypoxic tumour areas. Cellular adaptation to low oxygen is mediated by Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs). We found that deletion of HIF-1α in NK cells inhibited tumour growth despite impaired tumour cell killing. Tumours developing in these conditions were characterised by a high-density network of immature vessels, severe haemorrhage, increased hypoxia, and facilitated metastasis due to non-productive angiogenesis. Loss of HIF-1α in NK cells increased the bioavailability of the major angiogenic cytokine vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) by decreasing the infiltration of NK cells that express angiostatic soluble VEGFR-1. In summary, this identifies the hypoxic response in NK cells as an inhibitor of VEGF-driven angiogenesis, yet, this promotes tumour growth by allowing the formation of functionally improved vessels.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Anatomy
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:November 2017
Deposited On:20 Nov 2017 17:21
Last Modified:01 Mar 2018 16:46
Publisher:Nature Publishing Group
ISSN:2041-1723
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-017-01599-w
PubMed ID:29150606

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