Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Abacavir use and risk of recurrent myocardial infarction: the D: A: D study


Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between abacavir (ABC) use and recurrent myocardial infarction (MI) among HIV-positive people with a prior MI.
DESIGN: International multi-cohort collaboration with follow-up from 1999-2016.
METHODS: The rate of recurrent MI was described among D:A:D participants who experienced an index MI whilst in the study, and who remained under follow-up beyond 28 days after this MI. Follow-up was considered to the date of next MI, death, 01/Feb/2016 or 6 months after last clinic visit. Poisson regression models considered associations between recurrent MI and exposure to ABC (use at index MI, current post-MI exposure and cumulative exposure), before and after adjusting for calendar year.
RESULTS: The 984 individuals who experienced an index MI during the study (91.3% male, median age 51 at index MI) were followed for 5312 person-years (PY) over which time there were 136 recurrent MIs (rate 2.56/100 PY, 95% Confidence Interval 2.13-2.99). Rates were 2.40 (1.71-3.09) and 2.65 (2.10-3.21)/100 PY in those who were and were not on ABC, respectively, at the index MI, and 2.90 (2.01-3.78) and 2.44 (1.95-2.93)/100 PY in those who were and were not currently receiving ABC, respectively, post-MI. No association was seen with recurrent MI and either cumulative exposure to ABC (RR=0.86 [0.68-1.10]/5 years), receipt of ABC at index MI (0.90 [0.63-1.29]) nor recent post-MI exposure to ABC (1.19 [0.82-1.71]).
CONCLUSIONS: Among people with a previous MI, there was no evidence for an association between use of ABC post-MI and an elevated risk of a recurrent MI.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between abacavir (ABC) use and recurrent myocardial infarction (MI) among HIV-positive people with a prior MI.
DESIGN: International multi-cohort collaboration with follow-up from 1999-2016.
METHODS: The rate of recurrent MI was described among D:A:D participants who experienced an index MI whilst in the study, and who remained under follow-up beyond 28 days after this MI. Follow-up was considered to the date of next MI, death, 01/Feb/2016 or 6 months after last clinic visit. Poisson regression models considered associations between recurrent MI and exposure to ABC (use at index MI, current post-MI exposure and cumulative exposure), before and after adjusting for calendar year.
RESULTS: The 984 individuals who experienced an index MI during the study (91.3% male, median age 51 at index MI) were followed for 5312 person-years (PY) over which time there were 136 recurrent MIs (rate 2.56/100 PY, 95% Confidence Interval 2.13-2.99). Rates were 2.40 (1.71-3.09) and 2.65 (2.10-3.21)/100 PY in those who were and were not on ABC, respectively, at the index MI, and 2.90 (2.01-3.78) and 2.44 (1.95-2.93)/100 PY in those who were and were not currently receiving ABC, respectively, post-MI. No association was seen with recurrent MI and either cumulative exposure to ABC (RR=0.86 [0.68-1.10]/5 years), receipt of ABC at index MI (0.90 [0.63-1.29]) nor recent post-MI exposure to ABC (1.19 [0.82-1.71]).
CONCLUSIONS: Among people with a previous MI, there was no evidence for an association between use of ABC post-MI and an elevated risk of a recurrent MI.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics

Altmetrics

Downloads

0 downloads since deposited on 05 Dec 2017
0 downloads since 12 months

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Infectious Diseases
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2 January 2018
Deposited On:05 Dec 2017 15:17
Last Modified:09 Dec 2017 03:54
Publisher:Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
ISSN:0269-9370
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1097/QAD.0000000000001666
PubMed ID:29028664

Download

Content: Published Version
Language: English
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only until 2 January 2019
Size: 273kB
View at publisher
Embargo till: 2019-01-02