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Mechanical properties of triclosan sutures


Jungwirth-Weinberger, Anna; Grubhofer, Florian; Imam, Mohamed A; Bachmann, E; Wirth, Stephan (2017). Mechanical properties of triclosan sutures. Journal of Orthopaedic Research:Epub ahead of print.

Abstract

To avoid infections and wound healing disorders Triclosan coated sutures have been invented. Little is known of these sutures regarding their tensile properties. Three different Triclosan coated sutures (Vicryl 1 plus, PDS 0 plus, Monocryl 3-0 plus) were tested at several time points over 42 days regarding load to failure, strain and stiffness compared to their non-coated versions (Vicryl 1, PDS 0, Monocryl 3-0). Four different measurement points were made. Suture loops were fixed in a material testing machine over two metal bars which were moved apart creating a stress to the fiber. Unpaired, two-tailed t-test were performed for each group (untreated and treated) while level of significance was defined at a level of P<0.05. Vicryl 1 was significantly stronger on day 14 than Vicryl 1 plus (p=0.033). On day 28 significant changes were found in PDS 0 which was weaker compared to PDS 0 plus (p=0.039) and Vicryl 1 which was stronger than Vicryl 1 plus (p=0.032). We have seen that Vicryl 1 plus sutures are significantly weaker according to loading to failure after 14 and 28 days, which might cause incisional hernias. PDS 0 sutures are used to reconstruct tendons, therefore a longer durableness might be of interest as re-ruptures of tendons are problematic. Our in vitro findings support the use of Triclosan coated PDS plus sutures and Vicryl sutures as they show a longer resistance. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Abstract

To avoid infections and wound healing disorders Triclosan coated sutures have been invented. Little is known of these sutures regarding their tensile properties. Three different Triclosan coated sutures (Vicryl 1 plus, PDS 0 plus, Monocryl 3-0 plus) were tested at several time points over 42 days regarding load to failure, strain and stiffness compared to their non-coated versions (Vicryl 1, PDS 0, Monocryl 3-0). Four different measurement points were made. Suture loops were fixed in a material testing machine over two metal bars which were moved apart creating a stress to the fiber. Unpaired, two-tailed t-test were performed for each group (untreated and treated) while level of significance was defined at a level of P<0.05. Vicryl 1 was significantly stronger on day 14 than Vicryl 1 plus (p=0.033). On day 28 significant changes were found in PDS 0 which was weaker compared to PDS 0 plus (p=0.039) and Vicryl 1 which was stronger than Vicryl 1 plus (p=0.032). We have seen that Vicryl 1 plus sutures are significantly weaker according to loading to failure after 14 and 28 days, which might cause incisional hernias. PDS 0 sutures are used to reconstruct tendons, therefore a longer durableness might be of interest as re-ruptures of tendons are problematic. Our in vitro findings support the use of Triclosan coated PDS plus sutures and Vicryl sutures as they show a longer resistance. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Uncontrolled Keywords:Degradation; In vitro; Material properties; Orthopaedic surgery; Suture; Triclosan
Language:English
Date:2 December 2017
Deposited On:12 Dec 2017 16:31
Last Modified:19 Feb 2018 09:33
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:0736-0266
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/jor.23814
PubMed ID:29205483

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