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The expression pattern of keratin 24 in tissue-engineered dermo-epidermal human skin substitutes in an in vivo model


Klar, Agnes S; Michalak, Katarzyna; Böttcher-Haberzeth, Sophie; Reichmann, Ernst; Meuli, Martin; Biedermann, Thomas (2018). The expression pattern of keratin 24 in tissue-engineered dermo-epidermal human skin substitutes in an in vivo model. Pediatric Surgery International, 34(2):237-244.

Abstract

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: The use of autologous tissue-engineered skin substitutes is a promising approach to cover large skin defects in patients. Preclinical investigation is pivotal to test and improve the quality of these bio-engineered substitutes. In the skin, the epidermis, formed mainly by keratinocytes, provides the first physical barrier protecting from the environment. Proper keratinocyte differentiation and, thus, formation of a stratified epidermis is essential for this function. Keratins, the main structural support of keratinocytes, play a vital role regarding differentiation of keratinocytes. Here, we examined the expression pattern of a recently described keratinocyte differentiation marker, namely Keratin 24, in our skin substitutes.
MATERIALS AND METHODS: Human epidermal keratinocytes, melanocytes, dermal fibroblasts, palmar fibroblasts or sweat gland cells were used to prepare skin substitutes. Fibroblast-containing collagen hydrogels were prepared, and keratinocytes or sweat gland cells and melanocytes were seeded onto the hydrogels. The generated tissue-engineered dermo-epidermal skin analogs were transplanted onto full-thickness skin wounds created on the back of immuno-incompetent rats. The skin substitutes were excised at different time points and histologically examined with regard to Keratin 24 expression.
RESULTS: We observed the expression of Keratin 24 in keratinocytes of the upper stratum spinosum of the epidermis. In particular, we observed an intensified expression of Keratin 24 13 weeks after transplantation compared to 4 weeks after transplantation. Importantly, we noticed a markedly higher presence of Keratin 24 in more spinous layers if we used palmar fibroblasts or sweat gland cells in our skin substitutes compared non-palmar fibroblasts or epidermal keratinocytes.
CONCLUSION: Our observations prove that the keratinocyte differentiation marker Keratin 24 is expressed in our dermo-epidermal skin substitutes in a normal pattern. This highlights that our bio-engineered skin analogs mature and reach homeostasis in an in vivo assay. These findings harbor favorable implications regarding future clinical application.

Abstract

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: The use of autologous tissue-engineered skin substitutes is a promising approach to cover large skin defects in patients. Preclinical investigation is pivotal to test and improve the quality of these bio-engineered substitutes. In the skin, the epidermis, formed mainly by keratinocytes, provides the first physical barrier protecting from the environment. Proper keratinocyte differentiation and, thus, formation of a stratified epidermis is essential for this function. Keratins, the main structural support of keratinocytes, play a vital role regarding differentiation of keratinocytes. Here, we examined the expression pattern of a recently described keratinocyte differentiation marker, namely Keratin 24, in our skin substitutes.
MATERIALS AND METHODS: Human epidermal keratinocytes, melanocytes, dermal fibroblasts, palmar fibroblasts or sweat gland cells were used to prepare skin substitutes. Fibroblast-containing collagen hydrogels were prepared, and keratinocytes or sweat gland cells and melanocytes were seeded onto the hydrogels. The generated tissue-engineered dermo-epidermal skin analogs were transplanted onto full-thickness skin wounds created on the back of immuno-incompetent rats. The skin substitutes were excised at different time points and histologically examined with regard to Keratin 24 expression.
RESULTS: We observed the expression of Keratin 24 in keratinocytes of the upper stratum spinosum of the epidermis. In particular, we observed an intensified expression of Keratin 24 13 weeks after transplantation compared to 4 weeks after transplantation. Importantly, we noticed a markedly higher presence of Keratin 24 in more spinous layers if we used palmar fibroblasts or sweat gland cells in our skin substitutes compared non-palmar fibroblasts or epidermal keratinocytes.
CONCLUSION: Our observations prove that the keratinocyte differentiation marker Keratin 24 is expressed in our dermo-epidermal skin substitutes in a normal pattern. This highlights that our bio-engineered skin analogs mature and reach homeostasis in an in vivo assay. These findings harbor favorable implications regarding future clinical application.

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Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2018
Deposited On:03 Jan 2018 14:34
Last Modified:31 Jan 2018 02:03
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0179-0358
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00383-017-4198-9
PubMed ID:29039047

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