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Differentially methylated region-representational difference analysis (DMR-RDA): a powerful method to identify DMRs in uncharacterized genomes


Sasheva, Pavlina; Grossniklaus, Ueli (2017). Differentially methylated region-representational difference analysis (DMR-RDA): a powerful method to identify DMRs in uncharacterized genomes. In: Kovalchuk, I. Plant Epigenetics. Boston, MA: Springer, 113-125.

Abstract

Over the last years, it has become increasingly clear that environmental influences can affect the epigenomic landscape and that some epigenetic variants can have heritable, phenotypic effects. While there are a variety of methods to perform genome-wide analyses of DNA methylation in model organisms, this is still a challenging task for non-model organisms without a reference genome. Differentially methylated region-representational difference analysis (DMR-RDA) is a sensitive and powerful PCR-based technique that isolates DNA fragments that are differentially methylated between two otherwise identical genomes. The technique does not require special equipment and is independent of prior knowledge about the genome. It is even applicable to genomes that have high complexity and a large size, being the method of choice for the analysis of plant non-model systems.

Abstract

Over the last years, it has become increasingly clear that environmental influences can affect the epigenomic landscape and that some epigenetic variants can have heritable, phenotypic effects. While there are a variety of methods to perform genome-wide analyses of DNA methylation in model organisms, this is still a challenging task for non-model organisms without a reference genome. Differentially methylated region-representational difference analysis (DMR-RDA) is a sensitive and powerful PCR-based technique that isolates DNA fragments that are differentially methylated between two otherwise identical genomes. The technique does not require special equipment and is independent of prior knowledge about the genome. It is even applicable to genomes that have high complexity and a large size, being the method of choice for the analysis of plant non-model systems.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Book Section, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Department of Plant and Microbial Biology
07 Faculty of Science > Zurich-Basel Plant Science Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:580 Plants (Botany)
Language:English
Date:2017
Deposited On:10 Jan 2018 15:24
Last Modified:19 Feb 2018 10:14
Publisher:Springer
Series Name:Methods in Molecular Biology
Number:1456
ISSN:1064-3745
ISBN:978-1-4899-7706-9
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4899-7708-3_10
PubMed ID:27770362

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