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Iron phosphate nanoparticles for food fortification: Biological effects in rats and human cell lines


von Moos, Lea M; Schneider, Mirjam; Hilty, Florentine M; Hilbe, Monika; Arnold, Myrtha; Ziegler, Nathalie; Mato, Diogo Sales; Winkler, Hans; Tarik, Mohamed; Ludwig, Christian; Naegeli, Hanspeter; Langhans, Wolfgang; Zimmermann, Michael B; Sturla, Shana J; Trantakis, Ioannis A (2017). Iron phosphate nanoparticles for food fortification: Biological effects in rats and human cell lines. Nanotoxicology, 11(4):496-506.

Abstract

Nanotechnology offers new opportunities for providing health benefits in foods. Food fortification with iron phosphate nanoparticles (FePO4 NPs) is a promising new approach to reducing iron deficiency because FePO4 NPs combine high bioavailability with superior sensory performance in difficult to fortify foods. However, their safety remains largely untested. We fed rats for 90 days diets containing FePO4 NPs at doses at which iron sulfate (FeSO4), a commonly used food fortificant, has been shown to induce adverse effects. Feeding did not result in signs of toxicity, including oxidative stress, organ damage, excess iron accumulation in organs or histological changes. These safety data were corroborated by evidence that NPs were taken up by human gastrointestinal cell lines without reducing cell viability or inducing oxidative stress. Our findings suggest FePO4 NPs appear to be as safe for ingestion as FeSO4.

Abstract

Nanotechnology offers new opportunities for providing health benefits in foods. Food fortification with iron phosphate nanoparticles (FePO4 NPs) is a promising new approach to reducing iron deficiency because FePO4 NPs combine high bioavailability with superior sensory performance in difficult to fortify foods. However, their safety remains largely untested. We fed rats for 90 days diets containing FePO4 NPs at doses at which iron sulfate (FeSO4), a commonly used food fortificant, has been shown to induce adverse effects. Feeding did not result in signs of toxicity, including oxidative stress, organ damage, excess iron accumulation in organs or histological changes. These safety data were corroborated by evidence that NPs were taken up by human gastrointestinal cell lines without reducing cell viability or inducing oxidative stress. Our findings suggest FePO4 NPs appear to be as safe for ingestion as FeSO4.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Veterinary Pharmacology and Toxicology
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Veterinary Pathology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Date:2017
Deposited On:11 Jan 2018 15:14
Last Modified:19 Feb 2018 10:14
Publisher:Informa Healthcare
ISSN:1743-5390
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1080/17435390.2017.1314035

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