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Justifying the judgment process neither affects judgment accuracy, nor strategy use


Hoffmann, Janina A; Gaissmaier, C; von Helversen, Bettina (2017). Justifying the judgment process neither affects judgment accuracy, nor strategy use. Judgment and Decision Making, 12(6):627-641.

Abstract

Decision quality is often evaluated based on whether decision makers can adequately explain the decision process. Account- ability often improves judgment quality because decision makers weigh and integrate information more thoroughly, but it could also hurt judgment processes by disrupting retrieval of previously encountered cases. We investigated to what degree process accountability motivates decision makers to shift from retrieval of past exemplars to rule-based integration processes. This shift may hinder accurate judgments in retrieval-based configural judgment tasks (Experiment 1) but may improve accuracy in elemental judgment tasks requiring weighing and integrating information (Experiment 2). In randomly selected trials, participants had to justify their judgments. Process accountability neither changed how accurately people made a judgment, nor the judgment strategies. Justifying the judgment process only decreased confidence in trials involving a justification. Overall, these results imply that process accountability may affect judgment quality less than expected.

Abstract

Decision quality is often evaluated based on whether decision makers can adequately explain the decision process. Account- ability often improves judgment quality because decision makers weigh and integrate information more thoroughly, but it could also hurt judgment processes by disrupting retrieval of previously encountered cases. We investigated to what degree process accountability motivates decision makers to shift from retrieval of past exemplars to rule-based integration processes. This shift may hinder accurate judgments in retrieval-based configural judgment tasks (Experiment 1) but may improve accuracy in elemental judgment tasks requiring weighing and integrating information (Experiment 2). In randomly selected trials, participants had to justify their judgments. Process accountability neither changed how accurately people made a judgment, nor the judgment strategies. Justifying the judgment process only decreased confidence in trials involving a justification. Overall, these results imply that process accountability may affect judgment quality less than expected.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, not refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Date:2017
Deposited On:11 Jan 2018 15:54
Last Modified:19 Feb 2018 10:21
Publisher:Society for Judgment and Decision Making
ISSN:1930-2975
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:Official URL. An embargo period may apply.
Official URL:http://journal.sjdm.org/17/17411/jdm17411.pdf

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