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Surface coating of PLGA microparticles with protamine enhances their immunological performance through facilitated phagocytosis


Martínez Gómez, J M; Csaba, N; Fischer, S; Sichelstiel, A; Kündig, T M; Gander, B; Johansen, P (2008). Surface coating of PLGA microparticles with protamine enhances their immunological performance through facilitated phagocytosis. Journal of Controlled Release, 130(2):161-167.

Abstract

Surface modifications of poly(lactide-co-glycolide) microparticles with different polycationic electrolytes have mainly been studied for conjugation to antigens and/or adjuvants. However, the in vivo immunological effects of using surface charged particles have not been address yet. In this study, microparticles were coated or not with protamine, a cationic and arginine-rich electrolyte that confers microparticles with a positively surface charge. We then evaluated the potential of protamine-coatings to assist the induction of immune responses in mice. Interestingly, enhanced antibodies and T-cell responses were observed in mice treated with the coated particles. In vitro studies suggested that the improved immunological performance was mediated by an increased uptake. Indeed, protamine-coated particles that carried a plasmid were even internalised into non-phagocytic cells and to cause their transfection. These results open the way for further research into a novel technology that combines the use protamine for facilitated cell penetration of that and biodegradable microparticles for prolonged antigen or drug release.

Abstract

Surface modifications of poly(lactide-co-glycolide) microparticles with different polycationic electrolytes have mainly been studied for conjugation to antigens and/or adjuvants. However, the in vivo immunological effects of using surface charged particles have not been address yet. In this study, microparticles were coated or not with protamine, a cationic and arginine-rich electrolyte that confers microparticles with a positively surface charge. We then evaluated the potential of protamine-coatings to assist the induction of immune responses in mice. Interestingly, enhanced antibodies and T-cell responses were observed in mice treated with the coated particles. In vitro studies suggested that the improved immunological performance was mediated by an increased uptake. Indeed, protamine-coated particles that carried a plasmid were even internalised into non-phagocytic cells and to cause their transfection. These results open the way for further research into a novel technology that combines the use protamine for facilitated cell penetration of that and biodegradable microparticles for prolonged antigen or drug release.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Dermatology Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:September 2008
Deposited On:19 Feb 2009 14:34
Last Modified:18 Feb 2018 10:58
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0168-3659
OA Status:Green
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jconrel.2008.06.003
PubMed ID:18588928

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