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Medication with antihistamines impairs allergen-specific immunotherapy in mice


Johansen, P; Senti, G; Maria Martínez Gómez, J; Kündig, T M (2008). Medication with antihistamines impairs allergen-specific immunotherapy in mice. Clinical and Experimental Allergy, 38(3):512-519.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Histamine released from activated mast cells and basophils is an important mediator in allergy. Therefore, antihistamines are efficiently and widely used to suppress allergic symptoms. OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the role of antihistamines in sensitization against allergens and in the efficiency of allergen-specific immunotherapy. METHODS: CBA mice were sensitized and de-sensitized with bee venom allergen extracts and the major allergen phospholipase A2. Clemastine was used to test the effect of a histamine-1 receptor antagonist on the immune responses to phospholipase A2. RESULTS: The results demonstrated that sensitization against bee venom was strongly enhanced during treatment with antihistamines. Clemastine increased IgE production while decreasing IgG2a production against bee venom. This T-helper type 2 shift of the humoral response appeared to be caused by reduced IFN-gamma and enhanced IL-4 secretion from allergen-specific T cells. We also found reduced TNF-alpha, IL-6 and major histocompatibility complex class-II expression by macrophages. In sensitized mice, the efficiency of allergen-specific immunotherapy was reduced by clemastine treatment. CONCLUSION: Antihistamines may enhance allergic sensitization and reduce the efficiency of allergen-specific immunotherapy. Future studies will need to demonstrate to what extent pre-medication with antihistamine also affects allergen-specific immunotherapy in humans.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Histamine released from activated mast cells and basophils is an important mediator in allergy. Therefore, antihistamines are efficiently and widely used to suppress allergic symptoms. OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the role of antihistamines in sensitization against allergens and in the efficiency of allergen-specific immunotherapy. METHODS: CBA mice were sensitized and de-sensitized with bee venom allergen extracts and the major allergen phospholipase A2. Clemastine was used to test the effect of a histamine-1 receptor antagonist on the immune responses to phospholipase A2. RESULTS: The results demonstrated that sensitization against bee venom was strongly enhanced during treatment with antihistamines. Clemastine increased IgE production while decreasing IgG2a production against bee venom. This T-helper type 2 shift of the humoral response appeared to be caused by reduced IFN-gamma and enhanced IL-4 secretion from allergen-specific T cells. We also found reduced TNF-alpha, IL-6 and major histocompatibility complex class-II expression by macrophages. In sensitized mice, the efficiency of allergen-specific immunotherapy was reduced by clemastine treatment. CONCLUSION: Antihistamines may enhance allergic sensitization and reduce the efficiency of allergen-specific immunotherapy. Future studies will need to demonstrate to what extent pre-medication with antihistamine also affects allergen-specific immunotherapy in humans.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Dermatology Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:March 2008
Deposited On:18 Feb 2009 16:41
Last Modified:06 Dec 2017 18:27
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0954-7894
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2222.2007.02904.x
PubMed ID:18081882

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