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Regional differences in cerebral glucose metabolism after cardiac arrest and resuscitation in rats using [18F]FDG positron emission tomography and autoradiography


Putzu, Alessandro; Valtorta, Silvia; Di Grigoli, Giuseppe; Haenggi, Matthias; Belloli, Sara; Malgaroli, Antonio; Gemma, Marco; Landoni, Giovanni; Beretta, Luigi; Moresco, Rosa Maria (2017). Regional differences in cerebral glucose metabolism after cardiac arrest and resuscitation in rats using [18F]FDG positron emission tomography and autoradiography. Neurocritical Care:Epub ahead of print.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Cardiac arrest is an important cause of morbidity and mortality. Brain injury severity and prognosis of cardiac arrest patients are related to the cerebral areas affected. To this aim, we evaluated the variability and the distribution of brain glucose metabolism after cardiac arrest and resuscitation in an adult rat model.
METHODS: Ten rats underwent 8-min cardiac arrest, induced with a mixture of potassium and esmolol, and resuscitation, performed with chest compressions and epinephrine. Eight sham animals received anesthesia and experimental procedures identical to the ischemic group except cardiac arrest induction. Brain metabolism was assessed using [18F]FDG autoradiography and small animal-dedicated positron emission tomography.
RESULTS: The absolute glucose metabolism measured with [18F]FDG autoradiography 2 h after cardiac arrest and resuscitation was lower in the frontal, parietal, occipital, and temporal cortices of cardiac arrest animals, showing, respectively, a 36% (p = 0.006), 32% (p = 0.016), 36% (p = 0.009), and 32% (p = 0.013) decrease compared to sham group. Striatum, hippocampus, thalamus, brainstem, and cerebellum showed no significant changes. Relative regional metabolism indicated a redistribution of metabolism from cortical area to brainstem and cerebellum.
CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest that cerebral regions have different susceptibility to moderate global ischemia in terms of glucose metabolism. The neocortex showed a higher sensibility to hypoxia-ischemia than other regions. Other subcortical regions, in particular brainstem and cerebellum, showed no significant change compared to non-ischemic rats.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Cardiac arrest is an important cause of morbidity and mortality. Brain injury severity and prognosis of cardiac arrest patients are related to the cerebral areas affected. To this aim, we evaluated the variability and the distribution of brain glucose metabolism after cardiac arrest and resuscitation in an adult rat model.
METHODS: Ten rats underwent 8-min cardiac arrest, induced with a mixture of potassium and esmolol, and resuscitation, performed with chest compressions and epinephrine. Eight sham animals received anesthesia and experimental procedures identical to the ischemic group except cardiac arrest induction. Brain metabolism was assessed using [18F]FDG autoradiography and small animal-dedicated positron emission tomography.
RESULTS: The absolute glucose metabolism measured with [18F]FDG autoradiography 2 h after cardiac arrest and resuscitation was lower in the frontal, parietal, occipital, and temporal cortices of cardiac arrest animals, showing, respectively, a 36% (p = 0.006), 32% (p = 0.016), 36% (p = 0.009), and 32% (p = 0.013) decrease compared to sham group. Striatum, hippocampus, thalamus, brainstem, and cerebellum showed no significant changes. Relative regional metabolism indicated a redistribution of metabolism from cortical area to brainstem and cerebellum.
CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest that cerebral regions have different susceptibility to moderate global ischemia in terms of glucose metabolism. The neocortex showed a higher sensibility to hypoxia-ischemia than other regions. Other subcortical regions, in particular brainstem and cerebellum, showed no significant change compared to non-ischemic rats.

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Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Cardiocentro Ticino
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:5 September 2017
Deposited On:06 Feb 2018 18:42
Last Modified:19 Feb 2018 10:26
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:1541-6933
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s12028-017-0445-0
PubMed ID:28875429

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