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Microencapsulation of Lactobacillus bulgaricus and survival assays under simulated gastrointestinal conditions


Chen, Hai-Yan; Li, Xiang-Yi; Liu, Bing-Jie; Meng, Xiang-Hong (2017). Microencapsulation of Lactobacillus bulgaricus and survival assays under simulated gastrointestinal conditions. Journal of Functional Foods, 29:248-255.

Abstract

Probiotic Lactobacillus bulgaricus was microencapsulated in whey protein isolate using emulsion technique with transglutaminase-induced gelation and alginate coating. The high encapsulation efficiency (95.28 ± 2.31%) achieved in experiments demonstrated the compatibility between wall materials and the probiotic strain. In both simulated gastric juice and bile tolerance tests, microencapsulation provided significant protection against cell mortality compared to the control. Results from optical and scan electron microscopy observations showed complete encapsulation of probiotic cells in the wall materials, suggesting that the protection was provided by the strong penetration-resistant physical barriers of the microcapsules. During the freeze-drying process, the wall materials alone provided little protection against cell mortality. But with additional lyoprotectants, the survival rates of probiotic cells were improved remarkably. In addition, microencapsulated cells exhibited much better retainability of cell survival during storage, especially under low temperatures.

Abstract

Probiotic Lactobacillus bulgaricus was microencapsulated in whey protein isolate using emulsion technique with transglutaminase-induced gelation and alginate coating. The high encapsulation efficiency (95.28 ± 2.31%) achieved in experiments demonstrated the compatibility between wall materials and the probiotic strain. In both simulated gastric juice and bile tolerance tests, microencapsulation provided significant protection against cell mortality compared to the control. Results from optical and scan electron microscopy observations showed complete encapsulation of probiotic cells in the wall materials, suggesting that the protection was provided by the strong penetration-resistant physical barriers of the microcapsules. During the freeze-drying process, the wall materials alone provided little protection against cell mortality. But with additional lyoprotectants, the survival rates of probiotic cells were improved remarkably. In addition, microencapsulated cells exhibited much better retainability of cell survival during storage, especially under low temperatures.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Language:English
Date:2017
Deposited On:17 Jan 2018 19:11
Last Modified:19 Feb 2018 10:29
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1756-4646
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jff.2016.12.015

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