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Non-adaptive origins of evolutionary innovations increase network complexity in interacting digital organisms


Fortuna, Miguel A; Zaman, Luis; Wagner, Andreas; Bascompte, Jordi (2017). Non-adaptive origins of evolutionary innovations increase network complexity in interacting digital organisms. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences, 372(1735):431.

Abstract

The origin of evolutionary innovations is a central problem in evolutionary biology. To what extent such innovations have adaptive or non-adaptive origins is hard to assess in real organisms. This limitation, however, can be overcome using digital organisms, i.e. self-replicating computer programs that mutate, evolve and coevolve within a user-defined computational environment. Here, we quantify the role of the non-adaptive origins of host resistance traits in determining the evolution of ecological interactions among host and parasite digital organisms.We find that host resistance traits arising spontaneously as exaptations increase the complexity of antagonistic host–parasite networks. Specifically, they lead to higher host phenotypic diversification, a larger number of ecological interactions and higher heterogeneity in interaction strengths. Given the potential of network architecture to affect network dynamics, such exaptationsmay increase the persistence of entire communities. Our in silico approach, therefore, may complement current theoretical advances aimed at disentangling the ecological and evolutionary mechanisms shaping species interaction networks. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Process and pattern in innovations from cells to societies’.

Abstract

The origin of evolutionary innovations is a central problem in evolutionary biology. To what extent such innovations have adaptive or non-adaptive origins is hard to assess in real organisms. This limitation, however, can be overcome using digital organisms, i.e. self-replicating computer programs that mutate, evolve and coevolve within a user-defined computational environment. Here, we quantify the role of the non-adaptive origins of host resistance traits in determining the evolution of ecological interactions among host and parasite digital organisms.We find that host resistance traits arising spontaneously as exaptations increase the complexity of antagonistic host–parasite networks. Specifically, they lead to higher host phenotypic diversification, a larger number of ecological interactions and higher heterogeneity in interaction strengths. Given the potential of network architecture to affect network dynamics, such exaptationsmay increase the persistence of entire communities. Our in silico approach, therefore, may complement current theoretical advances aimed at disentangling the ecological and evolutionary mechanisms shaping species interaction networks. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Process and pattern in innovations from cells to societies’.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Language:English
Date:2017
Deposited On:26 Jan 2018 11:24
Last Modified:22 Feb 2018 10:56
Publisher:Royal Society Publishing
ISSN:0962-8436
OA Status:Closed
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1098/rstb.2016.0431

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