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Transient severe tricuspid regurgitation after transplantation of an extremely oversized donor heart in a child-Does size matter? A case report


Birnbaum, J; Ulrich, S M; Schramm, R; Hagl, C; Lehner, A; Fischer, M; Haas, N A; Heineking, B (2017). Transient severe tricuspid regurgitation after transplantation of an extremely oversized donor heart in a child-Does size matter? A case report. Pediatric Transplantation, 21(1):65-77.

Abstract

In pediatric heart transplantation, the size of the donor organ is an important criterion for organ allocation. Oversized donor hearts are often accepted with good results, but some complications in relation to a high donor-recipient ratio have been described. Our patient was transplanted for progressive heart failure in dilated cardiomyopathy. The donor-to-recipient weight ratio was 3 (donor weight 65 kg, recipient weight 22 kg). The intra-operative echocardiography before chest closure showed excellent cardiac function, no tricuspid valve regurgitation, and a normal central venous pressure. After chest closure, central venous pressure increased substantially and echocardiography revealed a severe tricuspid insufficiency. As other reasons for right ventricular dysfunction, that is, myocardial ischemia, pulmonary hypertension, and rejection, were excluded, we assumed that the insufficiency was caused by an alteration of the right ventricular geometry. After 1 week, the valve insufficiency regressed to a minimal degree. In pediatric heart transplant patients with a high donor-to-recipient weight ratio, the outlined complication may occur. If other reasons for right ventricular heart failure can be ruled out, this entity is most likely caused by an acute and transient alteration of the right ventricular geometry that may disappear over time.

Abstract

In pediatric heart transplantation, the size of the donor organ is an important criterion for organ allocation. Oversized donor hearts are often accepted with good results, but some complications in relation to a high donor-recipient ratio have been described. Our patient was transplanted for progressive heart failure in dilated cardiomyopathy. The donor-to-recipient weight ratio was 3 (donor weight 65 kg, recipient weight 22 kg). The intra-operative echocardiography before chest closure showed excellent cardiac function, no tricuspid valve regurgitation, and a normal central venous pressure. After chest closure, central venous pressure increased substantially and echocardiography revealed a severe tricuspid insufficiency. As other reasons for right ventricular dysfunction, that is, myocardial ischemia, pulmonary hypertension, and rejection, were excluded, we assumed that the insufficiency was caused by an alteration of the right ventricular geometry. After 1 week, the valve insufficiency regressed to a minimal degree. In pediatric heart transplant patients with a high donor-to-recipient weight ratio, the outlined complication may occur. If other reasons for right ventricular heart failure can be ruled out, this entity is most likely caused by an acute and transient alteration of the right ventricular geometry that may disappear over time.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Pneumology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:February 2017
Deposited On:23 Jan 2018 15:34
Last Modified:19 Feb 2018 10:36
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:1397-3142
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/petr.12863
PubMed ID:27925367

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