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Adverse reactions to orthodontic materials


Sifakakis, Iosif; Eliades, Theodore (2017). Adverse reactions to orthodontic materials. Australian Dental Journal, 62(S1):20-28.

Abstract

Adverse effects can arise from the clinical use of orthodontic materials, due to the release of constituent substances (ions from alloys and monomers, degradation by-products, and additives from polymers). Moreover, intraoral aging affects the biologic properties of materials. The aim of this review is to present the currently identified major adverse effects of the metallic and polymeric components found in orthodontic appliances and materials. Corrosion in metallic orthodontic attachments releases metal ions, mainly iron, chromium, and nickel. The latter has received the greatest attention because of its reported potential for an allergic response. The formation of an oxide layer may inhibit the outward movement of ions, thereby acting as an obstacle for release. Titanium alloys have superior corrosion resistance than stainless steel. The efficiency of polymerisation is considered an essential property for all polymers. A poor polymer network is susceptible to the release of biologically reactive substances, such as bisphenol-A (BPA), which is capable of inducing hormone-related effects. The close proximity of a light-curing tip to the adhesive, pumice prophylaxis after bonding, indirect irradiation and mouth rinsing during the first hour after bonding may decrease BPA release. The adverse effects of some orthodontic materials should be considered during material selection and throughout orthodontic treatment, in order to minimise possible undesirable implications.

Abstract

Adverse effects can arise from the clinical use of orthodontic materials, due to the release of constituent substances (ions from alloys and monomers, degradation by-products, and additives from polymers). Moreover, intraoral aging affects the biologic properties of materials. The aim of this review is to present the currently identified major adverse effects of the metallic and polymeric components found in orthodontic appliances and materials. Corrosion in metallic orthodontic attachments releases metal ions, mainly iron, chromium, and nickel. The latter has received the greatest attention because of its reported potential for an allergic response. The formation of an oxide layer may inhibit the outward movement of ions, thereby acting as an obstacle for release. Titanium alloys have superior corrosion resistance than stainless steel. The efficiency of polymerisation is considered an essential property for all polymers. A poor polymer network is susceptible to the release of biologically reactive substances, such as bisphenol-A (BPA), which is capable of inducing hormone-related effects. The close proximity of a light-curing tip to the adhesive, pumice prophylaxis after bonding, indirect irradiation and mouth rinsing during the first hour after bonding may decrease BPA release. The adverse effects of some orthodontic materials should be considered during material selection and throughout orthodontic treatment, in order to minimise possible undesirable implications.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Dental Medicine > Clinic for Orthodontics and Pediatric Dentistry
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:March 2017
Deposited On:27 Feb 2018 16:14
Last Modified:14 Mar 2018 17:58
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:0045-0421
Additional Information:For accepted manuscripts: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Sifakakis, I., Eliades, T. (2017) Adverse reactions to orthodontic materials. Australian Dental Journal, 62: S1 20–28., which has been published in final form at doi.org/10.1111/adj.12473. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving (http://olabout.wiley.com/WileyCDA/Section/id-820227.html#terms).
OA Status:Green
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/adj.12473
PubMed ID:28297095

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