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Comparison between magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, and arthrography to identify artificially induced cartilage defects of the equine carpal joints


Suarez Sanchez-Andrade, José; Richter, Henning; Kühn, Karolin; Bischofberger, Andrea S; Kircher, Patrick R; Hoey, Sèamus (2018). Comparison between magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, and arthrography to identify artificially induced cartilage defects of the equine carpal joints. Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound:Epub ahead of print.

Abstract

While articular cartilage changes are considered to be one of the initial events in the pathological cascade leading to osteoarthritis, these changes remain difficult to detect using conventional diagnostic imaging modalities such as plain radiography. The aim of this prospective, experimental, methods comparison study was to compare the sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic resonance arthrography, computed tomography (CT), and CT arthrography in the detection of artificially induced articular cartilage defects in the equine carpal joints. Defects were created in the antebrachiocarpal and middle carpal joint using curettage by a board-certified equine surgeon. Normal articular cartilage thickness varied from a maximum of 1.22 mm at the level of the distal aspect of the radius to a minimum of 0.17 mm in the proximal articular surface of the third carpal bone. Regarding cartilaginous defect measurements the remaining cartilaginous bed range from a maximum of 0.776 mm in the partial thickness defects, and 0 mm (defect reaches the subchondral bone) when total thickness defect were made. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging were performed followed by CT arthrography and magnetic resonance arthrography after antebrachiocarpal and middle carpal intraarticular contrast administration. All images were reviewed by two board-certified veterinary radiologists, both of whom were blinded to the location, presence of, and thickness of the cartilage defects. A total number of 72 lesions in nine limbs were created. Mean sensitivity for localizing cartilage defects varied between imaging modalities with CT arthrography showing the best sensitivity (69.9%), followed by magnetic resonance arthrography (53.5%), MRI (33.3%), and CT (18.1%) respectively. The addition of contrast arthrography in both magnetic resonance and CT improved the rate of cartilage lesion detection although no statistical significance was found. Computed tomographic arthrography displayed the best sensitivity for detecting articular cartilage defects in the equine antebrachiocarpal and middle-carpal joints, compared to magnetic resonance arthrography, MRI, and CT.

Abstract

While articular cartilage changes are considered to be one of the initial events in the pathological cascade leading to osteoarthritis, these changes remain difficult to detect using conventional diagnostic imaging modalities such as plain radiography. The aim of this prospective, experimental, methods comparison study was to compare the sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic resonance arthrography, computed tomography (CT), and CT arthrography in the detection of artificially induced articular cartilage defects in the equine carpal joints. Defects were created in the antebrachiocarpal and middle carpal joint using curettage by a board-certified equine surgeon. Normal articular cartilage thickness varied from a maximum of 1.22 mm at the level of the distal aspect of the radius to a minimum of 0.17 mm in the proximal articular surface of the third carpal bone. Regarding cartilaginous defect measurements the remaining cartilaginous bed range from a maximum of 0.776 mm in the partial thickness defects, and 0 mm (defect reaches the subchondral bone) when total thickness defect were made. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging were performed followed by CT arthrography and magnetic resonance arthrography after antebrachiocarpal and middle carpal intraarticular contrast administration. All images were reviewed by two board-certified veterinary radiologists, both of whom were blinded to the location, presence of, and thickness of the cartilage defects. A total number of 72 lesions in nine limbs were created. Mean sensitivity for localizing cartilage defects varied between imaging modalities with CT arthrography showing the best sensitivity (69.9%), followed by magnetic resonance arthrography (53.5%), MRI (33.3%), and CT (18.1%) respectively. The addition of contrast arthrography in both magnetic resonance and CT improved the rate of cartilage lesion detection although no statistical significance was found. Computed tomographic arthrography displayed the best sensitivity for detecting articular cartilage defects in the equine antebrachiocarpal and middle-carpal joints, compared to magnetic resonance arthrography, MRI, and CT.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Equine Department
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Clinical Diagnostics and Services
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Uncontrolled Keywords:articular cartilage; carpus; direct arthrography; osteoarthritis
Language:English
Date:18 February 2018
Deposited On:28 Feb 2018 11:33
Last Modified:14 Mar 2018 15:38
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:1058-8183
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/vru.12598
PubMed ID:29455473

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