Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Quantitative global mapping of terrestrial vegetation photosynthesis: The Fluorescence Explorer (FLEX) mission


Moreno, Jose; Colombo, Roberto; Damm, Alexander; Goulas, Yves; Middleton, Elizabeth; Miglietta, Franco; Mohammed, Gina; Möttus, Matti; North, Peter; Rascher, Uwe; van der Tol, Christiaan; Drusch, Matthias (2017). Quantitative global mapping of terrestrial vegetation photosynthesis: The Fluorescence Explorer (FLEX) mission. In: 2017 IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium (IGARSS), Fort Worth (Texas, USA), 23 July 2017 - 28 July 2017, 435-438.

Abstract

Although traditional remote sensing systems based on spectral reflectance can already provide estimates of the “potential” photosynthetic activity of terrestrial vegetation through the quantification of total canopy chlorophyll content or absorbed photosynthetic radiation, the determination of the “actual” photosynthetic activity of terrestrial vegetation requires information about how the absorbed light is used by plants, such as vegetation fluorescence, using very high spectral resolution spectroscopy in the range 650-800 nm. The Fluorescence Explorer (FLEX) mission, selected in November 2015 as the 8th Earth Explorer by the European Space Agency (ESA), carries the FLORIS spectrometer, with a spectral resolution of 0.3 nm and a spatial resolution of 300 m, with a swath of 150 km. The FLEX mission is designed to fly in tandem with the Copernicus Sentinel-3 satellite, in order to provide all the necessary information to disentangle emitted fluorescence from the background reflected radiance, and to allow proper interpretation of the fluorescence spatial and temporal changes in relation to photosynthesis dynamics, accounting for non-photochemical energy dissipation and canopy temperature effects.

Abstract

Although traditional remote sensing systems based on spectral reflectance can already provide estimates of the “potential” photosynthetic activity of terrestrial vegetation through the quantification of total canopy chlorophyll content or absorbed photosynthetic radiation, the determination of the “actual” photosynthetic activity of terrestrial vegetation requires information about how the absorbed light is used by plants, such as vegetation fluorescence, using very high spectral resolution spectroscopy in the range 650-800 nm. The Fluorescence Explorer (FLEX) mission, selected in November 2015 as the 8th Earth Explorer by the European Space Agency (ESA), carries the FLORIS spectrometer, with a spectral resolution of 0.3 nm and a spatial resolution of 300 m, with a swath of 150 km. The FLEX mission is designed to fly in tandem with the Copernicus Sentinel-3 satellite, in order to provide all the necessary information to disentangle emitted fluorescence from the background reflected radiance, and to allow proper interpretation of the fluorescence spatial and temporal changes in relation to photosynthesis dynamics, accounting for non-photochemical energy dissipation and canopy temperature effects.

Statistics

Citations

Altmetrics

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 20 Mar 2018
1 download since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Paper), not_refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography
Dewey Decimal Classification:910 Geography & travel
Language:English
Event End Date:28 July 2017
Deposited On:20 Mar 2018 10:37
Last Modified:31 Jul 2018 05:53
Publisher:IEEE
ISBN:978-1-5090-4951-6
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1109/IGARSS.2017.8126987
Official URL:http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/8126987/

Download