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Genetic testing facilitates prepubertal diagnosis of congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism


Xu, C; Lang-Muritano, Mariarosaria; Phan-Hug, F; Dwyer, A A; Sykiotis, G P; Cassatella, D; Acierno, J; Mohammadi, M; Pitteloud, N (2017). Genetic testing facilitates prepubertal diagnosis of congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Clinical Genetics, 92(2):213-216.

Abstract

Neonatal micropenis and cryptorchidism raise the suspicion of congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (CHH), a rare genetic disorder caused by gonadotropin-releasing hormone deficiency. Low plasma testosterone levels and low gonadotropins during minipuberty provide a clinical diagnostic clue, yet these tests are seldomly performed in general practice. We report a male neonate with no family history of reproductive disorders who was born with micropenis and cryptorchidism. Hormonal testing at age 2.5 months showed low testosterone (0.3 nmol/L) and undetectable gonadotropins (luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone both <0.5 U/L), suggestive of CHH. Genetic testing identified a de novo, heterozygous mutation in fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1 p.L630P). L630 resides on the ATP binding cleft of the FGFR1 tyrosine kinase domain, and L630P is predicted to cause a complete loss of receptor function. Cell-based assays confirmed that L630P abolishes FGF8 signaling activity. Identification of a loss-of-function de novo FGFR1 mutation in this patient confirms the diagnosis of CHH, allowing for a timely hormonal treatment to induce pubertal development. Therefore, genetic testing can complement clinical and hormonal assessment for a timely diagnosis of CHH in childhood.

Abstract

Neonatal micropenis and cryptorchidism raise the suspicion of congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (CHH), a rare genetic disorder caused by gonadotropin-releasing hormone deficiency. Low plasma testosterone levels and low gonadotropins during minipuberty provide a clinical diagnostic clue, yet these tests are seldomly performed in general practice. We report a male neonate with no family history of reproductive disorders who was born with micropenis and cryptorchidism. Hormonal testing at age 2.5 months showed low testosterone (0.3 nmol/L) and undetectable gonadotropins (luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone both <0.5 U/L), suggestive of CHH. Genetic testing identified a de novo, heterozygous mutation in fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1 p.L630P). L630 resides on the ATP binding cleft of the FGFR1 tyrosine kinase domain, and L630P is predicted to cause a complete loss of receptor function. Cell-based assays confirmed that L630P abolishes FGF8 signaling activity. Identification of a loss-of-function de novo FGFR1 mutation in this patient confirms the diagnosis of CHH, allowing for a timely hormonal treatment to induce pubertal development. Therefore, genetic testing can complement clinical and hormonal assessment for a timely diagnosis of CHH in childhood.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:August 2017
Deposited On:21 Mar 2018 14:32
Last Modified:13 Apr 2018 11:45
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:0009-9163
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/cge.12996
PubMed ID:28195315

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