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The effect of respiratory muscle endurance training in patients with myasthenia gravis


Rassler, B; Hallebach, G; Kalischewski, P; Baumann, I; Schauer, J; Spengler, C M (2007). The effect of respiratory muscle endurance training in patients with myasthenia gravis. Neuromuscular Disorders, 17(5):385-391.

Abstract

We tested the effect of a home-based respiratory muscle endurance training in patients with mild to moderate generalized myasthenia gravis (MG) on Besinger score, lung function and respiratory muscle endurance. Ten patients performed respiratory muscle endurance training in form of normocapnic hyperpnea training at 50-60% of their maximal voluntary ventilation over 4-6 weeks. MG score, lung function and respiratory endurance were assessed before and after training period. The training significantly increased respiratory endurance from 8.4+/-0.9 min to 17.1+/-1.3 min (p<0.001) and total ventilatory volume from 555+/-87 L to 1081+/-127 L (p=0.004). About 25% of this gain was lost after 3-5 months of detraining. The remaining 75% gain might result from improved neuromuscular coordination rather than muscular training. MG score and lung function, however, did not change. Patients assessed the training effects on physical fitness and respiration as positive. In conclusion, respiratory muscle endurance training can be useful for MG patients as it is enhancing respiratory muscle endurance.

Abstract

We tested the effect of a home-based respiratory muscle endurance training in patients with mild to moderate generalized myasthenia gravis (MG) on Besinger score, lung function and respiratory muscle endurance. Ten patients performed respiratory muscle endurance training in form of normocapnic hyperpnea training at 50-60% of their maximal voluntary ventilation over 4-6 weeks. MG score, lung function and respiratory endurance were assessed before and after training period. The training significantly increased respiratory endurance from 8.4+/-0.9 min to 17.1+/-1.3 min (p<0.001) and total ventilatory volume from 555+/-87 L to 1081+/-127 L (p=0.004). About 25% of this gain was lost after 3-5 months of detraining. The remaining 75% gain might result from improved neuromuscular coordination rather than muscular training. MG score and lung function, however, did not change. Patients assessed the training effects on physical fitness and respiration as positive. In conclusion, respiratory muscle endurance training can be useful for MG patients as it is enhancing respiratory muscle endurance.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Physiology
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:May 2007
Deposited On:20 Mar 2009 16:22
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:05
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0960-8966
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nmd.2007.01.001
PubMed ID:17336068

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