Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

CNS immune surveillance and neuroinflammation: endocannabinoids keep control


Wolf, S A; Tauber, S; Ullrich, O (2008). CNS immune surveillance and neuroinflammation: endocannabinoids keep control. Current Pharmaceutical Design, 14(23):2266-2278.

Abstract

To avoid inflammatory escalation, the central nervous system (CNS) harbors an impressive arsenal of cellular and molecular mechanisms enabling strict control of immune reactions. We here summarize studies suggesting that the old paradigm of the "CNS immune privilege" is overly simplistic. The immune system is allowed to keep the CNS under surveillance, but in a strictly controlled, limited and well-regulated manner. The first line of defense lies outside the brain parenchyma to spare neuronal tissue from the detrimental effects of an inflammatory immune response. As a second line of defense neuroinflammation is unavoidable when pathogens infiltrate the brain or the CNS-immune-homeostasis fails. Inflammation in the CNS is often accompanied by divers brain pathologies. We here review recent strategies to maintain brain homeostasis and modulate neuroinflammation. We focus on Multiple Sclerosis as an example of a complex neuroinflammatory disease. In the past years, several in vitro, in vivo and clinical studies suggested that the endocannabinoid system participates crucially in the immune control and protection of the CNS. We discuss here the endocannabinoid system as a key regulator mechanism of the cross talk between brain and the immune system as well as its potential as a therapeutic target.

Abstract

To avoid inflammatory escalation, the central nervous system (CNS) harbors an impressive arsenal of cellular and molecular mechanisms enabling strict control of immune reactions. We here summarize studies suggesting that the old paradigm of the "CNS immune privilege" is overly simplistic. The immune system is allowed to keep the CNS under surveillance, but in a strictly controlled, limited and well-regulated manner. The first line of defense lies outside the brain parenchyma to spare neuronal tissue from the detrimental effects of an inflammatory immune response. As a second line of defense neuroinflammation is unavoidable when pathogens infiltrate the brain or the CNS-immune-homeostasis fails. Inflammation in the CNS is often accompanied by divers brain pathologies. We here review recent strategies to maintain brain homeostasis and modulate neuroinflammation. We focus on Multiple Sclerosis as an example of a complex neuroinflammatory disease. In the past years, several in vitro, in vivo and clinical studies suggested that the endocannabinoid system participates crucially in the immune control and protection of the CNS. We discuss here the endocannabinoid system as a key regulator mechanism of the cross talk between brain and the immune system as well as its potential as a therapeutic target.

Statistics

Citations

23 citations in Web of Science®
28 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Anatomy
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2008
Deposited On:04 Mar 2009 14:39
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:05
Publisher:Bentham Science
ISSN:1381-6128
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.2174/138161208785740090
Related URLs:http://www.benthamdirect.org/pages/content.php?CPD/2008/00000014/00000023/0003B.SGM
PubMed ID:18781977

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations